Author Topic: US Development in Football/Soccer  (Read 16216 times)

duffbeer

  • Guest
Re: US Development in Football/Soccer
« Reply #20 on: December 27, 2010, 05:03:35 PM »
Resurrecting this thread to post this article,

http://msn.foxsports.com/foxsoccer/usa/story/ncaa-winning-akrons-caleb-porter-leading-by-example

because I like how Ives explains the role of college soccer in the US soccer landscape.  Like me he believes it is needed.  It is also a nice feel good story about Caleb Porter, the coach of the NCAA Champion Zips, and his decision to turn down MLS and stay at Akron to build their program.  Our local paper said he just signed a 10 yr contract with Akron for $350,000/yr.  A lot for a college socceer coach but still less than Akron's basketball and football programs which will never come within 150 miles of a national championship.  Also, I dont know what DC United offered Porter but I bet it was significantly more than $350K.

Offline pettyfog

  • Lakey/Dark Room
  • *
  • Posts: 67
Re: US Development in Football/Soccer
« Reply #21 on: December 29, 2010, 06:06:14 PM »
Resurrecting this thread to post this article,

http://msn.foxsports.com/foxsoccer/usa/story/ncaa-winning-akrons-caleb-porter-leading-by-example

because I like how Ives explains the role of college soccer in the US soccer landscape.  ...

Good for you, Maureen.  I dont see why this thread couldnt be stickied.. or relabeled national players development or some such.  Would be good to see what's going on in Oz and elsewhere too.

Offline McBridefan1

  • Legend
  • ***
  • Posts: 1423
Re: US Development in Football/Soccer
« Reply #22 on: December 09, 2012, 01:55:14 PM »
I know college is important and has its place in developing soccer, but too many kids that are really good slip through the cracks. My little brother in law is trying to get into college, the kid is the son of a professional soccer player and he has offers from developemental teams in portugal So if he can't get into at least a division 2 college because of his 2.0 GPA then he is off to portugal... just another good future ball player lost to over seas clubs that know what to look for. Our "scouts" in this country haven't got a scoobie because if a kid isn't in college he goes unnoticed, sad really.


Offline Steve_orino

  • Legend
  • ***
  • Posts: 1193
  • White & Black: One State at a Time
Re: US Development in Football/Soccer
« Reply #23 on: December 10, 2012, 07:28:41 PM »
Interesting read from Michael Owen's blog: http://www.michaelowen.com/blog.html

The title is: "Too much too soon" – Website won’t allow me to cut & paste…

Cliff Note version:  Mr. Owen suggests that between the ages of 19 & 24, 125 to 175 games need to be played by the typical football (soccer) player to make sure their body develops (about 25-35 games a season).  In his early career, he played a lot of games for Club & Country and he has been labeled as injury-prone after sustaining a hamstring injury.  On the other hand, Scholes & Giggs, both were brought in slowly and thus we’ve seen a sustained quality about their careers.

The College season is 20+ games in 3 to 4 months time.  Reserve squad in MLS gets less, only 10 guaranteed games.  This, during a crucial age too. 

@ Mr. McBridefan – perhaps going to Portugal would be the best thing for your brother-in-law if he wants to pursue a professional career.  College wouldn’t be so bad, especially with a degree, but being under their radar suggests that maybe they don’t know what to look for, considering a country with a solid League & solid National Team is interested in signing him.

Offline Steve_orino

  • Legend
  • ***
  • Posts: 1193
  • White & Black: One State at a Time
Re: US Development in Football/Soccer
« Reply #24 on: December 10, 2012, 09:33:57 PM »
The Bundesliga & German National Team are a great example for MLS to follow.
 
I posted recently on a FC Dallas website...

From: Leander Schaerlaeckens – http://msn.foxsports.com/foxsoccer/mls/story/youth-over-aging-stars-in-post-david-beckham-major-league-soccer-era-120412

From Bundesliga.com – http://www.bundesliga.com/en/liga/news/2012/0000232784.php

At the turn of the millennium, however, the picture was far bleaker. With an ageing and mediocre side, Germany’s national team, as defending champions, exited UEFA EURO 2000 with just a paltry point and one goal to show from their three group games. The humiliation was compounded by a humbling 3-0 defeat to an already-qualified second-string Portugal team as well as a first competitive loss to England for 34 years. It was the watershed moment that revealed the need for German football to reinvent itself.

 A new directive was required to restore football in Germany to its former glory. The path decided upon by those in charge at the German Football Federation (DFB) and newly-created German Football League (DFL) was to invest in youth. In practice, this involved replicating the French model of a national academy at Clairefontaine and extending it to all 36 clubs in the Bundesliga and Bundesliga 2, a plan that was finally implemented in 2001. "

 
And from Goal.com (India) – http://www.goal.com/en-india/news/2292/editorials/2012/12/04/3573849/the-bundesliga-blueprint-that-has-the-german-league-taking
“It all started in 2000 after Germany disgracefully exited the European Championship, having only gained a single point in a group which included Portugal, Romania and England. Luck had deserted the Nationalmannschaft, which looked old and devoid of any inspiration, and had few talents to look forward to down the road. In response, the DFB revolutionised the system of youth development in Germany.
 
In December of 2000, the DFB created the DFL (German Football League) to manage the 1. and 2. Bundesliga. Shortly after its creation, the DFL enacted strict mandates for clubs to get their licence to join the league. All teams in the top two tiers of German football were required to have for their academies: a certain number of training pitches, an indoor training facility, massage rooms, saunas, and physiotherapists. In addition, the DFL raised the bar for obtaining a coaching licence at youth level.

 The DFL’s initiative to promote youth development was beneficial, not only for the German national team, but for Bundesliga sides,"

 
I wish Mr. Garber would stop spending time & money on a 2nd team in NY – he needs to use that money to make sure we have a better Reserve League (ie 20-30 games, full reserve squads, decent pitches to play on). The quality on the pitch is what will bring in fans/viewers. Take the TV ratings for example, there is more viewers of the PL & La Liga than MLS games. If there is quality available to view, we will find it no matter what obscure channel it is on...