Author Topic: FulhamUSA Has anybody kept any articles for when it comes back on line?  (Read 3024 times)

Offline LBNo11

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...I'm sure that Mike could do with a little help with photos and articles to get the Fulham USA website back up and running, so if you have any, why not post them on here to help?

Here's a starter: (A bigger version is avavilable if required)



« Last Edit: September 06, 2010, 09:38:03 AM by LBNo11 »

Offline LBNo11

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Re: Has anybody kept any articles for when the new FUSA comes back on line?
« Reply #1 on: September 05, 2010, 10:21:36 PM »
...an article that I reproduced on FUSA in the early days:-

This was written to show the relevance of the old Fulham FC badge in relation to the history of the region:-



 "Pro Civibus et Civitate" (For The People And The State). Civic arms of FULHAM METROPOLITAN BOROUGH COUNCIL granted 12th October 1927.

The wavy blue lines on the white ground of the shield are emblematical of the River Thames, which forms the most important geographical feature of the district, and bounds the borough for a little more than half its area.

The crossed swords through a golden mitre on a red saltire are taken from the arms of the See of London, whose Bishops represented by the mitre have held the Manor of Fulham since the end of the seventh century.

The ancient black ship with a white sail bearing a red and a white rose at the centre, refers to the visit of the Danes to Fulham in the year 879. It accentuates the ecclesiastical character of Fulham whose Manor, which included also the parish of Hammersmith, belonged to the Bishops...


Offline LBNo11

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Re: Has anybody kept any articles for when the new FUSA comes back on line?
« Reply #2 on: September 05, 2010, 11:05:02 PM »
The History of Fulham Football Club 
Written by FulhamUSA.com     
Sunday, 17 February 2008 17:08 
Fulham is the oldest of London's first class clubs and its long history began back in 1879 with some Sunday-school boys knocking a ball around on a long-forgotten park pitch. All a far cry from the multi-million pound internationals who make up the Premiership team of today.

Seventeen years later, when the first game was played at Craven Cottage, the symbiotic relationship between Club and ground was forged. More than almost any other club Fulham has become synonymous with its home, and the battle to stay there has been a dominant feature of Club affairs on numerous occasions during Fulham's history.

Fulham's history has, at times, been a genuine “Who's Who” of football folklore and the roll call underpins the underachievement of the Club through the years. England captain Johnny Haynes, one of the most gifted players of his generation, spent his entire first class career at Fulham between 1952 and 1970. The original Maestro, Haynes made the unprecedented steps of becoming the first footballer to earn £100 a week. However, the list does not stop there. Playing alongside Haynes in Fulham's last top-flight side of the 60s was another one-club man, England World Cup winner George Cohen. And to this day it can still be claimed that England have never won the World Cup without the contribution of a Fulham player.

Fulham has long been renowned for discovering promising young talent that has progressed to win major honours elsewhere. Alan Mullery (Tottenham & England), Rodney Marsh (QPR, Manchester City & England), and Allan Clarke (Leeds & England) all came to prominence with Fulham. Bobby Robson has achieved success at the highest level in four countries over five decades and it all began, for him, as a 17 year-old at Craven Cottage in 1950. More recently Ray Houghton (Liverpool, Aston Villa & Ireland), Paul Parker (Manchester United & England) and Tony Gale (West Ham & Blackburn) all forged their careers at Fulham before moving on to play in Championship-winning sides.

In addition to being a springboard for many blossoming futures, Fulham has been home to numerous legends in the autumn of their footballing lives. Mullery returned to Craven Cottage in 1972 and linked up with the legendary Bobby Moore, another of the World Cup-winning XI, to don the black and white. Together, Moore and Mullery guided Fulham through a record 11 matches to reach the 1975 FA Cup Final. Unfortunately, Moore's former employers West Ham got the better of his new team at Wembley. A year after the Cup final another old boy returned to join forces with a legend in his twilight years when Rodney Marsh and George Best signed. They were both past their best, however the entertainment factor was at a premium.

Despite the FA Cup Final and the star-studded line-ups of the 70s, it is the 60s that are viewed as the sepia-tinted halcyon days in Fulham's post-war history. The reason is pretty straight forward – between 1959 and 1968 the banks of the Thames were home to top-flight football. This was the era of Craven Cottage crowds exceeding 30,000, the era of regular visits from the likes of Manchester United and Arsenal. But Fulham's existence in the old First Division was often precarious. Never pushing higher than mid-table, it was only the threat of relegation that forced Fulham to raise their game.

By May 1968 Fulham had ridden their luck once too often and the sultry 27 points on the board made relegation unavoidable. “The real reason why Fulham have never won the League Championship is that we could never work up enough speed. That's why we've dropped back into the Second Division – to get a longer run at it,” quipped Fulham's music hall Chairman of the time, Tommy Trinder. The rabble-rousing comment may have been uttered in a light-hearted attempt to keep spirits up, but the reality of the matter is that the run-up he spoke of took 33 years.

In stark contrast to the relative stability of life in the top flight in the 60s, the ground beneath Craven Cottage constantly shifted as Fulham bobbed between the old Second and Third Divisions. Malcolm Macdonald's young Fulham side of the early 80s looked to be the ray of sunshine the Club so desperately craved and were touted by many as the best Fulham team since the 60s. However, two consecutive promotions in twelve months were denied at the final hurdle as Fulham threw away their last genuine attempt to regain top-flight status until the arrival of Mohamed Al Fayed.

As the face of football changed, so too did the disparity between the have's and the have nots, and mounting financial pressures led to the premature break up of this side which inevitably triggered a major downward spiral in Fulham's fortunes. In the meantime, as the Club passed between a succession of owners, all with their sights firmly set on the real estate value of the ground, the fight to remain at Craven Cottage intensified. By this time Fulham Football Club had been at the heart of the community for one hundred years.

As a selection of ground share options and residential developments that threatened the very survival of the Club were tossed around, it was the mettle of an alliance of supporters, led by former Fulham player and TV pundit Jimmy Hill, who ensured that Fulham Football Club would not be displaced from Craven Cottage.

However, as battles were fought and won in the board room, the gradual slide on the pitch continued until Fulham hit the football basement in 1994. In January 1996 the situation hit absolute rock bottom. Home gates were averaging a meagre 4000. The Club had less than 1000 season ticket holders, and employed only seven full time staff. In a bid to stem spiralling debt, the team trained on Epsom Downs and, so the story goes, one infamous training drill involved circuits of a park bench! In January 1996 Fulham travelled to Torquay United who were bottom of the entire Football League. Fulham were second from bottom, the Club's lowest ever League position. Fulham lost. For many it was the blackest day in the entire history of the Club. Staring non-league football right in the face, Fulham Football Club in its traditional guise was also staring at the prospect of extinction. Such a far cry from the days of Haynes, Cohen et al.

Fortunately, those days seem like a distant memory now. Flamboyant chairman Mohamed Al Fayed dreamt of Fulham winning the FA Premier League and invested heavily in pursuit of his ambition. After cruising to the First Division title in 2001, Al Fayed's expensively-assembled team was able to stand toe to toe with England's finest club sides. Fulham kicked-off the new season at Manchester United and showed they belonged in the top division with some sparkling football, despite a 3-2 defeat. Following three seasons of consolidation and improvement in the Premiership, ambitious Fulham remain one of the teams to watch, with Steed Malbranque establishing himself as a top-class midfielder. The club parted company with French coach Jean Tigana in April 2003, with Al Fayed's dream of challenging for the title now in the hands of Roy Hodgson who took over from Lawrie Sanchez in December of 2007. The Cottagers survived a relegation scare in the 2006-07 season after the sacking of Chris Coleman and in the 2007-08 season Fulham faces yet another relegation battle.

 


Offline HatterDon

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Re: Has anybody kept any articles for when the new FUSA comes back on line?
« Reply #3 on: September 06, 2010, 12:42:47 AM »
...I'm sure that Mike could do with a little help with photos and articles to get the Fulham USA website back up and running, so if you have any, why not post them on here to help?

Here's a starter: (A bigger version is avavilable if required)





I never tire of seeing that handsome gent in the upper right hand corner.  :004:


As to your question, I'll ask American Mike -- who is still working his Lawn Giland buttocks off trying to get the site cooking again.

White Noise

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Re: FulhamUSA Has anybody kept any articles for when it comes back on line?
« Reply #4 on: September 06, 2010, 12:29:47 PM »
The good old way back machine has some pages of the website archived. Once you have clicked through on a particular date you will see that you can click through to some of the content - thoughts its pretty much text only - and retrieve some of that as well.

http://web.archive.org/web/*/http://www.fulhamusa.com

Oops. Looks like you will have to click on the first bit above becuse it won't let me link the whole thing. Then just paste or type www.fulhamusa.com into the box and click to searc.)

http://web.archive.org/web/20080731123323/http://www.fulhamusa.com/

Has long been my favourite Fulham site (present company and all that) and lies somewhere between a minor miracle and a massive inspiration.
« Last Edit: September 06, 2010, 12:31:48 PM by White Noise »

duffbeer

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Re: FulhamUSA Has anybody kept any articles for when it comes back on line?
« Reply #5 on: September 06, 2010, 01:23:58 PM »
Does this mean that all of the threads will be gone?  I hope not. I had so much unfinished bidness.


Offline SteveM19

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Re: FulhamUSA Has anybody kept any articles for when it comes back on line?
« Reply #6 on: September 06, 2010, 01:27:52 PM »
I wrote this for FUSA last year when we whipped Ferguson and co. like a bunch of cur dogs who disgraced our house with their presence--

Cry, Cry Alex Ferguson Guy
(to the tune of the first three verses of American Pie -- Don McLean- American Pie (with Lyrics))

Just two short years ago
I can still remember how the Fulham
Made Man U fans smile.
Because Ronaldo had a chance
To make our backline quake and dance and
Giggs and Shrek could score goals all the while.
But Man Yoo hearts are truly broken
And truer words were never spoken
Than Scholes is just plain washed up
He might as well just give up
I can’t see how United cause
So many people so much awe
Fulham makes United fall
Today, ManU fans cryyyyyyyyyyyyy

So cry, cry Alex Ferguson guy
If you think that you’ll beat Fulham then you surely are high
Your slow old boys were beaten center and wide
And today’s the day your title hopes die
Today’s the day your title hopes die...............

Did you see our defensive line
Choke United chances off the vine
The midfield stopped their strikers cold
Zamora and Duff each popped the net
Clint Dempsey played his best game yet, and
Danny Murphy // made Paul Scholes look // so oooold
Now Hangeland and Gera were strong
Bobby Zamora tried them all day long
Chris Baird and Aaron Hughes
Left United so confused
I was unable to believe my luck
When the second and third goals had struck
Wayne Rooney seemed to scream “OH fcuk!”
Today, Man U fans cryyyyyyyyyyyy

 
We were singing
Cry, cry Alex Ferguson guy
If you think that you’ll beat Fulham then you surely are high
Your slow old boys were beaten center and wide
And today’s the day your title hopes die
Today’s the day your title hopes die...............

Hammy Enders in their splendor
Went to the pub and had a bender
Drinking beer and singing sooooooooooooooooongs
Although the day was very cold
And although Mark Schwarzer’s very old
We smothered United’s // attacks all // day loooooong
Now Konchesky had some stellar plays
And Pantsil kept his steady ways
Rooney kept dropping deep
Oh, did you hear that he shags sheep?
Basel and United back to back
Fell to the mighty white attack
Soon Ferguson will get the sack
Today, Man U fans cry

We were singing
Cry, cry Alex Ferguson guy
If you think that you’ll beat Fulham then you surely are high
Your slow old boys were beaten center and wide
And today’s the day your title hopes die
Today’s the day your title hopes die...............


And indeed, I think that the beatdown we gave them was the day they realized nope, wasn't gong to happen this year. Shame it went to the team that won it though. Oh well.
« Last Edit: September 06, 2010, 05:18:41 PM by SteveM19 »

Offline LBNo11

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Re: FulhamUSA Has anybody kept any articles for when it comes back on line?
« Reply #7 on: September 07, 2010, 01:28:54 PM »
...sorry but no accompanying pictures:-

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
...I was reminded looking at the official that the club have very little in depth history of the club - which is a shame. I came across this on the FulhamUSA site some time ago and found it a very interesting read and source of reference. Please see the link below and enjoy:-
http://fulhamusa.com/modules.php?op=modload&name=News&file=article&sid=361




Craven Cottage, the site of Fulham Football Club in London, has a surprising history. The name Craven Cottage was inherited from an altogether different edifice that once stood here: Baron Craven’s 18th century country house, a rendezvous for high society, including Edward VII, Napoleon III, Disraeli and Sheridan. The foundations of this illustrious predecessor lie beneath the Stevenage Road grandstand.


That a stadium was constructed over such a landmark harks back to the rise in popularity of football in the 19th century. When football developed in England, where the sport originated, it was played in the open countryside. It was not only easily played, but manageable in urban spaces and, importantly, took hold in the school system. After the Football Association was constituted in 1863, and the first football league formalised in 1888, these open spaces were fenced off and spectators paid to watch. To accommodate them, grandstands were built.


As the sport grew, the 1890s saw a boom in grandstand construction. It reached its apogee in 1922 when Aston Villa adapted a design by legendary stadium engineer Archibald Leitch for a brickwork extravagance of gables, pedimented towers and stained glass. Such a structure reinforces the sense of team identity that is central to the popularity of football. Regrettably, this particular masterpiece has been controversially demolished.



More modest, however, is an earlier Leitch construction on the banks of the Thames in Fulham. Craven Cottage, the current black and white structure with a mock Tudor gable, was built in 1905 for London’s first professional football club. Fulham FC’s fortunes rose and fell and in 1999, after it was rescued by Mohamed al Fayed, redevelopment of the site was proposed. Craven Cottage, now a listed building, was to be preserved at a new location as a museum, so important is it to the sense of identity and history of Fulham Football Club. In the process, the foundations of the earlier incarnation would likely be uncovered. The proposal will not proceed, but the story of the original Craven Cottage remains as riveting as any football game.



It started in 1667, in the wake of the Great Plague and the Great Fire of London, when William Craven was granted land in Fulham, a rural idyll of meadows and elm trees, frequented by the Royal Hunt. Craven, the eldest son of the Mayor of London, educated at Trinity College, Oxford, received the title of Baron on his 21st birthday. During the Civil War he gave financial support to both Charles l and Charles II. His extraordinary life included a liaison with the Queen of Bohemia, and commanding the Coldstream Guards, and in l665 he became the Earl of Craven.


FULHAM provided a healthy escape from the stench and disease in the capital and became the great “Fruit and Kitchen garden” for its few fortunate residents. There were no bridges over the river to attract traffic and it was more or less an exclusive domain for the gentry. It was William, 6th Baron Craven, who financed the construction of a country cottage, but his wife Elizabeth who fashioned it.


“The Ante-room shall have a folding door, fitted in with stained glass, opening upon the lawn, and communicating to a Grand Hall and to a circular veranda, supported by columns approaching the lawn, and thence to the river……


The Drawing Room shall have a vaulted roof and various apartments all linking and forming a most splendid suite, especially adapted to a Dejeuné a la fourchette, and not less inviting as a soirée.”


Elizabeth had married at 16 and had aspirations as an actress. Whether she fulfilled her promise is not known but her imagination was given full vent in the design of the cottage, which was built in 1780.


“Six good bedrooms, and further accomodation for the servants in the domestic wing. A water closet and a commodité, well placed at the back of the hall.”


This two storey thatched cottage lay in five acres, and the gardens drew no less attention. The estate was ornamented with weeping and other willows, and timber trees feathering to the ground. There was a kitchen garden and melon plantation with lofty walls abundantly clothed with choice fruit trees. A wall ran the entire length along the riverside, save at its southern-most point where a flight of steps led to an inlet from the Thames. It is believed that the purpose of this inlet was to enable visitors to draw close to the grounds in their state barges at high tides and the ‘Craven Steps’ enabled them to do so at low tide.


Yet Elizabeth was to stay only two years. She became enamoured of the Margrave of Ansbach and moved into Brandesbury House, a much larger property at Hammersmith. Here she had installed a mock Gothic theatre… perhaps that was all that had been omitted at Craven Cottage. Baron Craven died in 1791 but his name has stayed on to this day.


The cottage had a succession of owners after Baron Craven, becoming increasingly more lavishly decorated. One auctioneer’s advertisement was fulsome:

“The Main Hall is fitted up in the Egyptian style, being an exact copy from one of the plates in Denon’s Travels in Egypt during the campaigns of Napoleon Bonaparte. The interior is supported by eight immense columns, covered with hieroglyphics. A female figure in bronze, as large as life, stands near the door and a moveable camel, in bronze, stands near the entrance. The Hall leads on to the Chapel, which is nearly 50 foot long and 20 foot wide. The sides, as well as the ceiling, are painted in exact imitation of the Chapel of Henry VII at Westminster Abbey. The stained glass has been procured from France, pillaged at the start of the Revolution from various Palaces and Churches…
Opposite the Egyptian Hall is a Persian Chieftain’s tent, ornamented with panels of looking-glass, which between the blue striped linings of the tent, has a peculiar effect.”


From 1805 Craven Cottage underwent further embellishment by a Mr. Walsh Porter, and became a magnet for fashionable society, with guests such as Brinsley Sheridan, whose witty plays and political career made him part of the beau monde. By now the grandiose house, still referred to as a ‘cottage’, was the talk of London and a haven from the crowded city. Indeed the entire population of Fulham numbered only 4,400 at the beginning of the 19th century.


The potential of the cottage as a place for lucrative hospitality was not lost on the moneylender Charles King of Picadilly, who acquired it in 1834 after three owners came and went in quick succession.


Many anecdotes have been recorded on the remarkable Charles King. Captain Rees Gronow’s account is one of the most telling... “He had made the peerage a complete study, knew the exact position of everyone who was connected with a Coronet, the value of their property, how deeply the estates were mortgaged, and what encumbrances weighed upon them. Nor did his knowledge stop there; by dint of sundry kind attentions to the clerks of the leading banking-houses, he was aware of the balances they kept. He gave excellent dinners, at which many of the highest personages of the realm were present; they were not a little amused to find clients quite as highly placed as themselves, and with purses quite as empty.”


The next owner, in 1839, was the most colourful of all, Sir Edward George Earle Bulwer-Lytton, statesman, poet and occult novelist, whose son became Viceroy of India. Sir Edward had a tempestuous love life but compensated by travelling and writing. It is believed that his most enduring novel, “The Last Days of Pompeii” was written here. “Night and Morning” and “The Last of the Barons” certainly were. Lytton also entertained: The surgeon and geologist Gideon Mantell recalled an evening in his journal…....


“October 10th 1841- Very wet and stormy. Drove to Craven Cottage, Fulham, to dine with Sir Edward Bulwer-Lytton, with whom I had corresponded, but to whom I was personally unknown. The cottage is charmingly situated on the bank of the Thames, and is very recherché - A central vaulted apartment (called the Egyptian Hall) fitted à-la-Egypte, with a drawing room on one side and dining room on the other, and a charming little study and library entered from the Egyptian saloon, appeared to occupy the ground floor of the Mansion; which was furnished with excellent taste, and contained many choice objects of art and vertu.


Sir Edward received me with great cordiality, he is about the middle height, elegant in person and manners, spare in person, with dark hair and whiskers, an acquisitive nose, finely chiselled smooth chin; and evidently of delicate physical organisation. Three other gentlemen formed the party. I sat next to Sir E at dinner, and we conversed on a variety of subjects; his observations were striking and expressed in elegant language. Animal magnetism (which is now going through its revival in London!), Geology, the never ending topic - Shakespeare’s plagiarisms, which the late sale of Marlowe’s play of Richard 3rd - hitherto unknown - has given fresh interest to - the discoveries of the Microscope and Telescope - on literature and drama etc. I left at ten o’clock, much gratified with my visit to one whose writings had so often delighted me, and beguiled the hours of sorrow and sickness.”


Sir Edward was a lavish host, and was recalled by prominent 19th Century men for being so. Benjamin Disraeli, later to be Prime Minister, wrote to his sister after a dinner party at Craven Cottage: “Our host, whatever may be his situation, was more sumptuous and fantastic than ever. Mrs. Bulwer was a blaze of jewels and looked like Juno; only instead of a peacock she had a dog in her lap….” Disraeli later described Bulwer as “one of the few with whom my intellect comes into collision with benefit.”


In 1846 Sir Edward entertained at dinner Prince Louis Napoleon, who had recently escaped from the fortress of Ham, walking out disguised as a laborer. The Frenchman described “a pretty villa” in his memoirs. By this time Lytton had inherited Knebworth House in Hertfordshire, a Tudor mansion which had escaped radical change for over 300 years, and soon after Napoleon's visit, he left Craven Cottage and headed north.


At Knebworth it is possible to feel the atmosphere of Bulwer-Lytton’s presence. He changed the mansion to super Gothic, sprouting fantastic towers and spires. The State Drawing Room was transformed and the Caxton picture of him hangs here. He died aged 70 – the fitting biblical length of life of “three score years and ten” – and is buried at Westminster Abbey.


Meanwhile the last resident of Craven Cottage moved in. Sir Ralph Howard was to occupy it for fully 21 years.


Sir Ralph Howard and Lady Howard continued the tradition of society gatherings and included the Prince of Wales Edward VII and Mademoiselle Montijo, subsequently the Empress of the French, amongst their guests. For the convenience of friends, Sir Ralph had a private road formed from the cottage through into Fulham Palace Road, just north of St. James House. The mid 19th century was a time of enormous development in Fulham. The brick-earth along the river was perfect for house building and a thriving pottery industry also emerged. The River Thames was banked and narrowed in 1862 and access to Putney was possible over Fulham Bridge. Thousands of people started arriving, encouraged by work and new housing.


When the Howards vacated Craven Cottage in 1867, it marked the end of an era of gracious living and entertaining at the cottage.


In June 1868 a Mr. Walter Bentley Woodbury, an American, took it for conversion into a pleasure resort. There was talk of a Palace to be constructed with crystal glass, but nothing was done . Four years later it was purchased by Mr. Tod Heatly but stood tenantless.


Splendid isolation…decaying isolation. Who could maintain the lavish interiors and the dense gardens? An octagon summer-house, a turreted conservatory, a tool house and gardener’s cottage, all these additions over the years were now left to the forces of nature.


In 1883, a number of sketches were made by an anonymous artist. The atmospheric collage is included on the last page. Close examination shows the decay that had set in.


1888 proved to be an inauspicious year for this singular stretch of the Thamesbank; The Royal Humane Society protested at the lack of safety for a number of children who had drowned in the moat of Fulham Palace and, in the early hours of 8th May, a fire razed the derelict Craven Cottage to the ground. Riverboats arrived on the scene after two hours. They were too late.


Fulham Football Club’s connection with Craven Cottage spans over 100 years and it is little wonder that the names are inextricably linked.


Fulham had grown rapidly in the nineteenth century - from a population of 4,400 in 1801 to 137,000 in 1901. The transport infrastructure included railways, trams, motorcars and river steamers. The wooden bridge at Fulham had given way to concrete structures at Putney and Hammersmith, and each year they were filled with spectators watching the Varsity boat race. One of the early landmarks of this event was the Craven steps, still intact but with a wilderness behind it.


The growing population not unnaturally founded sporting organisations and one such was a football team from St. Augustine’s Mission in Lillie Road, where a Cup Final had been held. The game then was little more then a no-holds barred rough and tumble but it provided a healthy pastime for Fulham St. Andrews, as the club was named.


Formed in 1879, the club played wherever a field could be found. Just look at the venues that were used: Star Road, the old Ranelagh Club under Putney Bridge railway arch (with changing rooms at the “Eight Bells” pub), Eelbrook common, Putney lower common, Roskell’s field in Parsons Green Lane, Barn Elms (with dressing rooms at the “Red Lion” pub) and the Half Moon ground behind the boathouses at Putney.


By the time of the Half Moon residence, Fulham St. Andrews had become simply Fulham F.C. and the crowd had started to pay - a nominal threepence. With professionalism entering the game in the north of England, there was clearly a development path for the club and the desire for a ground to call its own. Talks regarding the site of Craven Cottage started in 1894: the ground was the property of the Ecclesiastical Commissioners and was still leased to Tod Heatly. From this gentleman Fulham obtained tenancy on the principle of sharing gate money on a 50/50 basis with him.


One of Fulham’s delegation was team captain Tom Shrimpton; H.D. Shrimpton, from the same family, wrote the Foundation History of the Fulham Football club. It is now an antiquarian title.


The club committee faced a formidable task in converting the ground. It was necessary to fill in the creek that led from the Thames, and the grounds had become a veritable lake. The work was contracted out to a local firm with the request that the entire area be raised some six feet above high-water level and a playing pitch be laid with a Cumberland turf surface.


Many trees and rotted vegetation were cleared and one workmen fell twelve feet through a rotted lid. A tunnel was found that joined the estate with the Putney side under the river. One can only surmise on the uses of it. At the same time that this clearance was being carried out, an underground railway between Shepherds Bush and Bank was being bored. Arrangements were made for the waste to be dumped at Craven Cottage where it provided the banking for spectator terracing. By 1896 the ground was ready, and drew warm recognition from the local press…...


“The Fulham Football Club has been making extensive arrangements in order to meet the requirement of the sporting section of the community. Their efforts in providing such a magnificent ground as that which is now being prepared at Craven Cottage, Crabtree Lane, deserve to meet with extensive patronage. The new ground, which will be ready for opening in about three weeks’ time, is in the form of a vast amphitheatre, and is capable of accommodating 50,000 persons; it is, in fact, almost a replica of the famous arena at Crystal Palace. No expense has been spared by the committee who are now considering plans for the erection of a grandstand and pavilion.”


5,000 people attended the opening fixture, a friendly, and the club turned professional in the 1900-1901 season. In 1905 the grandstand and Craven Cottage were built, both designed by Archibald Leitch.


By the First World War the streets around Craven Cottage were all built up. Support was guaranteed as Fulham moved from the Southern League and into the Football League. This story is not about the fortunes of Fulham’s football team but there have been highlights, which ensured that everyone knew about the lads from Craven Cottage. On the weekend after Prime Minister Chamberlain met Hitler and declared ‘Peace in our time’, 49,335 packed in to see a game against Millwall. This was in October 1938.


In 1949 Fulham were promoted to the First (now called Premier) Division and in 1975 appeared in the F.A. Cup Final at Wembley. Fulham has always been known as a friendly club and with more than a fair share of characters. However, by the early 1990’s, both club and ground were threatened…


There was a discernible change when the Dean family left the Board of Directors and men from outside the area gained control. Ernie Clay borrowed £1.5 million in 1985 to purchase the freehold of Craven Cottage from the Ecclesiastical Commissioners.


The commissioners allowed the sale to go ahead with the removal of a clause in the contract that stipulated the right of Fulham to play football there. Clay then sold his shares for £9m to Marler Estates, and the rest is history. An undignified scramble has gone on since 1985 and the team, demoralised, was relegated to the bottom division of the league. A renaissance has taken place in recent years and, with a return to the top flight secured, hopes are high that Fulham will soon have one of the country’s top stadia.




A Tale of Two Cottages:



 






1667 Baron Craven is granted land in Fulham
1780 Craven Cottage is built by 6th Baron Craven
1791 Death of Baron Craven
1888 Craven Cottage Destroyed by fire
1894 Fulham Football club lease the site
1896 The first football match in the grounds
1905 A new Craven Cottage is built by Archibald Leitch
1987 A decade of dispute on the future of the site begins
2000 Fulham Football club announces proposed redevelopment of the site and the preservation of Craven Cottage at a new location
2004 Redevelopment is cancelled and the club moves back in after two years absence.


Cottage Now

Cottage Then











Original Article from 1979:



Note: A special thank you to Vincent Heywood. For with out his knowledge, passion and pride for Fulham and Craven Cottage, this article and its photos might have been lost forever.


I hope that Mike can get hold of Vincent still to get the pictures to go with the article...

RidgeRider

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Re: FulhamUSA Has anybody kept any articles for when it comes back on line?
« Reply #8 on: September 07, 2010, 03:39:03 PM »
This gives me an idea whose merit I am not sure makes any sense, but our Exiles portion of the FoF board and FUSA should co-mingle content. Not sure how it would work yet, but just something I thought of as I read this thread. Wonder if threads could show up on either board and be read and posted to from either board. Just an idea.


Offline HatterDon

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Re: FulhamUSA Has anybody kept any articles for when it comes back on line?
« Reply #9 on: September 07, 2010, 09:32:52 PM »
Great idea, Jack. The one thing that FulhamUSA.com has been missing all these years is thread after thread about sausages!  :62:

Offline TheAmericanBigBen

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Re: FulhamUSA Has anybody kept any articles for when it comes back on line?
« Reply #10 on: September 08, 2010, 12:09:52 AM »
I'm trying to follow ClevelandMo's lead here in using a different logon name -- this is SteveM19 here.

I wrote this after the 2-0 Man United defeat in March 2009 -- to Johnny Cash's Ghost Riders in the Sky -- Johnny Cash-ghost riders in the sky

Sir Alex came to Fulham thinking three points for Man U
Just put out his team of all-stars, that's all he had to do
But Paul Scholes got a red card for playing volleyball that day
Then Murphy drilled the spot kick -- and the whites were on their way

Yippie-Ki-Yooooooooooo
Yippie-Ki-Yayyyyyyyyy

Heeeeeeear Man Uniiiiiiiiiiiiited cryyyyyyyyyyyyyyy

Danny Murphy was on fire and Zamora was the same
The Hangman, Hughes, and Schwarzer knocked United off their game
That overrated nancy boy kept crying all day long
Then Gera hit a blinder -- and we all broke out a song

Yippie-Ki-Yooooooooooo
Yippie-Ki-Yayyyyyyyyy

Heeeeeeear Man Uniiiiiiiiiiiiited cryyyyyyyyyyyyyyy

Two nil to the Fulham, we all smelled a victory
Potato-faced Wayne Rooney was as dumb as he could be
Give that punk a red card, send him back to where he came
Watch out for the corner flag -- and quit your crying game.

Yippie-Ki-Yooooooooooo
Yippie-Ki-Yayyyyyyyyy

Heeeeeeear Man Uniiiiiiiiiiiiited cryyyyyyyyyyyyyyy

Offline TheAmericanBigBen

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Re: FulhamUSA Has anybody kept any articles for when it comes back on line?
« Reply #11 on: September 08, 2010, 12:11:23 AM »
ALSO -- I got an email from The Godfather -- progress is being made.
« Last Edit: September 08, 2010, 12:13:12 AM by TheAmericanBigBen »


Offline LBNo11

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Re: FulhamUSA Has anybody kept any articles for when it comes back on line?
« Reply #12 on: September 08, 2010, 09:34:45 AM »
...regarding post #7 I have found some photographs that may have accompanied the article in a different file I kept - no idea what the order is at the moment but they are all to do with Craven Cottage past and present:-












duffbeer

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Re: FulhamUSA Has anybody kept any articles for when it comes back on line?
« Reply #13 on: September 08, 2010, 01:31:17 PM »
Thanks for posting the article and pics of the Cottage LB.  The history of the place is astounding.  The pictures are cool, but I must admit that I struggle to see the resemblence with the current structure.   I've always wondered about seating in the Cottage during matches.  Can you purchase seats there, are they really expensive, or are they reserved for club VIPs? 

Offline LBNo11

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Re: FulhamUSA Has anybody kept any articles for when it comes back on line?
« Reply #14 on: September 08, 2010, 01:54:24 PM »
...Mo, as mentioned the original Craven Cottagebuilt by Baron Craven in 1780 burned to the ground and it and the surrounding area became wilderness until Fulham FC took over the land in 1896, the Craven Cottage you see these days was built in 1905/6 by Archibald Leitch the then famous football ground architect.

On match days these days you have to be a player or players wife or dignitary to sit in the cottage balcony, a few years ago you could sit in there depending who you knew.

These days if you take the Cottage Tour (well worth it) you can walk around Craven Cottage see the dressing rooms , players rest room etc., as well as the rest of the ground - and sit on the balcony and take pictures, whilst being told about the history by a guide (or you could hire me for the tour :005:)...