Author Topic: Defending corners and freekicks  (Read 701 times)

Offline Ronnief

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Defending corners and freekicks
« on: August 12, 2019, 11:21:51 AM »
Why is it when we are defending a corner or free kick all our players retreat into or around our penalty area allowing the apposing team to send more players forward. Why can't we put our least effective defensive attacker to remain up field thus keeping at least two or three defenders in their own half.  This tactic would also allow us a chance when clearing the ball to attack instead of the ball coming straight back when it is cleared.

Offline Ordar

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Re: Defending corners and freekicks
« Reply #1 on: August 12, 2019, 11:33:28 AM »
Thats actually been a gripe of mine for a while. Seems to have happened all the way back to the Hodgson days.

Its always interesting to see how teams try and defend those set pieces, I remember Mourinho saying he would leave 3 attackers up as it would make the area less crowded and easier to defend, plus the chances of the counter attack are obviously greater

Offline whitejc

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Re: Defending corners and freekicks
« Reply #2 on: August 12, 2019, 11:37:12 AM »
Thats actually been a gripe of mine for a while. Seems to have happened all the way back to the Hodgson days.

Its always interesting to see how teams try and defend those set pieces, I remember Mourinho saying he would leave 3 attackers up as it would make the area less crowded and easier to defend, plus the chances of the counter attack are obviously greater

but surely you then run the risk of being outnumbered in your own box?


Offline copthornemike

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Re: Defending corners and freekicks
« Reply #3 on: August 12, 2019, 11:37:37 AM »
I think a lot of us think the same but it has been a reoccurring theme for a few seasons, since Roy arrived here I think.
Personally after Saturday I thought leaving Knockaert ‘up the pitch’ should be seriously considered as he is not the tallest of players for defending set pieces yet has the pace and determination to tie up 2-3 defenders.
The only other thought I have is maybe our recent managers want the opposition to leave as many players up front so we can hit them on a break. Mind you I cannot recall many occasions when that has succeeded if that was a serious aim!

Offline Sting of the North

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Re: Defending corners and freekicks
« Reply #4 on: August 12, 2019, 11:40:13 AM »
I think that if you believe that you are have the general aerial advantage the idea with a less crowded area might suit you. However, I do not believe that this Fulham team will feel that they have said advantage against most teams. It might therefore be better to crowd the area which makes it harder for attacking players since they have a relatively small area they are aiming for (the goal) compared to defenders (basically everywhere but the goal). This disadvantage is of course somewhat mitigated by a well placed corner kick, but nevertheless is is difficult to not only win the aerial duel in a very crowded area, but to also at the same time being able to direct the ball towards the goal.

Offline Syd Cupp

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Re: Defending corners and freekicks
« Reply #5 on: August 12, 2019, 02:43:25 PM »
If my mind serves me right we used to do something like this with Malbranque who was
some one who could run with and hold up the ball...Knockhart perhaps maybe someone similar.

Now there's a debate for a new post..!!


Offline Ronnief

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Re: Defending corners and freekicks
« Reply #6 on: August 12, 2019, 03:48:19 PM »
Of our forward players who do you thinks is the least effective as a defender?  Should Cavaleiro or Knockhart stay upfield?

Offline mrmicawbers

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Re: Defending corners and freekicks
« Reply #7 on: August 12, 2019, 03:55:36 PM »
i agree we should leave at least one person up the field who will probably attract two or three of the opposing team

Offline ALG01

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Re: Defending corners and freekicks
« Reply #8 on: August 12, 2019, 05:40:46 PM »
Why is it when we are defending a corner or free kick all our players retreat into or around our penalty area allowing the apposing team to send more players forward. Why can't we put our least effective defensive attacker to remain up field thus keeping at least two or three defenders in their own half.  This tactic would also allow us a chance when clearing the ball to attack instead of the ball coming straight back when it is cleared.

Brillaint point and one that has baffled me for years. roy brought 11 back, hughes and jol lbriught 11 back, kit and slava did too but I think it an error dfor the reasons you state.
only sanchez left players up the field and he was slated for it, along with the dianasurs dieing out.

I would leave the quickets player upfield or a centerforward capable of holding up the ball.


Offline hovewhite

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Re: Defending corners and freekicks
« Reply #9 on: August 12, 2019, 07:00:31 PM »
Maybe leave the 2 wingers up at corners and free kicks.

Offline Hatch007

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Re: Defending corners and freekicks
« Reply #10 on: August 12, 2019, 09:48:24 PM »
Great post and well-made point.

I manage my son’s U12 football team and always tell my defenders to have a spare man at the back when we have attacking corners.

So if the oppo leave one forward upfield, we’ll have two defenders back.

Conversely, we leave two forwards up when defending corners so as to occupy three of the opposition on the halfway line rather than in and around our box.

It’s not rocket science that most managers would want a spare defender at the back to mark opposition forwards when their team has an attacking corner so I’ve never understood the logic of bringing all eleven players back when defending corners.

Offline bill taylors apprentice

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Re: Defending corners and freekicks
« Reply #11 on: August 12, 2019, 10:07:18 PM »
Maybe they think the more congested the penalty area is if an attacker connects with the ball the more the chance it will hit a body and be cleared?

Sounds a bit lame to me but can't think of any better reason why everyone must come back!


Offline Andy S

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Re: Defending corners and freekicks
« Reply #12 on: August 12, 2019, 10:51:32 PM »
That’s exactly right. A team has to defend and win the ball before they can attack again. There is a lot more to coaching than a big boot up field
« Last Edit: August 12, 2019, 10:54:00 PM by Andy S »

Offline MJG

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Re: Defending corners and freekicks
« Reply #13 on: August 13, 2019, 12:26:51 PM »
This falls into the same catagory that we should have a man on each post as well. Its the modern game, if i recall it was Wenger who first took everyone back but I might be wrong.

Gone are days of Northampton leaving three on the halfway line.

Offline ALG01

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Re: Defending corners and freekicks
« Reply #14 on: August 13, 2019, 04:02:46 PM »
This falls into the same catagory that we should have a man on each post as well. Its the modern game, if i recall it was Wenger who first took everyone back but I might be wrong.

Gone are days of Northampton leaving three on the halfway line.

That is also a good point.
I like defending players on the posts for corners, I think that is a far better system than not having them, it makes the target smaller and more difficult for the forwards to deal with. It also assists (or should do) the goalkeeper as he can be more adventurous in coming for the ball etc.

I do think leaving 3 up the pitch may be excessive but I am not averse to the idea that one on the half way line and another on the edge of the center circle or our t wide may be a good idea.