Author Topic: Saturday Fulham Stuff - 31/10/20...  (Read 641 times)

Offline whitejc

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Saturday Fulham Stuff - 31/10/20...
« on: October 30, 2020, 11:18:27 AM »
Results

Friday
Wolves
2-0
Place
« Last Edit: October 30, 2020, 11:38:47 PM by whitejc »

Offline whitejc

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Re: Saturday Fulham Stuff - 31/10/20...
« Reply #1 on: October 30, 2020, 11:22:47 AM »
Johansen and Hector could have futures at Fulham, says Parker

Two Fulham players currently out in the cold could yet have futures at the club, according to Scott Parker.

However, boss Parker has warned Stefan Johansen and Michael Hector they would need to make life hard for him when it comes to future selections.

Johansen was omitted from the Premier League 25-man squad, and five average performances from Hector following the abject 3-0 defeat to Brentford in the Carabao Cup, saw him dropped.

The head coach believes the quick turnaround from the end of last season did nothing to help Hector.

And with the arrivals of Tosin Adarabioyo and Joachim Andersen, the former Chelsea centre-half has his work cut out to make a starting XI.

“Hec will be the first to admit the quick turnaround and the amount of games saw him struggling a bit,” Parker said.

“You need to realise where you are at moments like these.

“He needs to keep improving and learning from the step up.

“I’m sure he’s not pleased, not happy, but it’s what players like Hec learn from this that will make a difference.”

Norway international Johansen has a back problem, it was revealed, but Parker insists that’s not the reason he failed to make the squad.

“There is a problem at the moment, but he’s not going for surgery,” Parker added.

“He needs to get on top of it, but he’s got some time (until January) and it’s not a massive problem.

“Does it mean Stef has no future part to play? Definitely not.

“He needs to get as fit as he can and make my decision difficult whether to include him or not.”



https://www.westlondonsport.com/fulham/frozen-out-duo-could-still-have-future-at-fulham-says-parker

Offline whitejc

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Re: Saturday Fulham Stuff - 31/10/20...
« Reply #2 on: October 30, 2020, 11:23:41 AM »
Bilic shares key update on injured West Brom duo ahead of clash v Fulham

Slaven Bilic has said that West Brom pair Sam Field and Hal Robson-Kanu should be close to returning from injury following November’s international break.

Robson-Kanu has been suffering with a broken arm he sustained in Albion’s 2-0 loss to Southampton earlier this season while Field has missed his side’s last two games with a knee injury.

Speaking in his pre-Fulham press conference on Thursday Bilic said that both players would be ‘there or there abouts’ after November’s international break according to The Athletic’s Steve Madeley.

This follows news that Dara O’Shea is back in training with the Baggies after he missed his side’s trip to Brighton this week.

All three could be available when the Baggies take on Manchester United, which is Albion’s first game after the international break.

Having more players available will be a blessing for Bilic as his side enter a hectic Christmas Schedule.

Albion face six games in December where they will face both Manchester City and Liverpool as well as taking on local rivals Aston Villa.

The festive fixtures could make or break Albion’s season and having both Robson-Kanu and Field available can only boost the chances of the Baggies of getting something from those games.

Field is more defensively minded and can help to see out games if Albion have the lead. While Robson-Kanu adds a different and more experienced dimension upfront though he will probably be third in the pecking order behind Karlan Grant and Callum Robinson.

While neither player can expect to start, they both offer decent options from the bench and their return will be a boost to the Baggies.



https://www.westbromnews.co.uk/2020/10/30/bilic-shares-key-update-on-injured-west-brom-duo-ahead-of-clash-v-fulham/


Offline whitejc

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Re: Saturday Fulham Stuff - 31/10/20...
« Reply #3 on: October 30, 2020, 11:25:19 AM »
Black History Month – Rachel Yankey

Our series featuring black players from Fulham’s past for Black History Month culminates with Farrell Monk speaking to England and Fulham legend

Rachel Yankey
Major Honours for Fulham
National Premier League (1) 2002-03
FA Cup (2) 2001-02 & 2002-03
FA League Cup (2) 2002 & 2003

It’s clear how much Black History Month means to Yankey; the passion in her voice is evident. She points to her first-hand experience of educating young people. “It’s a fantastic opportunity to celebrate black people,” she explains. “I used to work in primary schools and you have this month dedicated to celebrating black people. The kids select a black hero to research. They get massively into exploring and understanding what those people they choose have done. And you can see how inspiring it is. You really see at the end of it.”

For Yankey, the results are clear. “When you are hearing the stories at the end and how they can relate that to their own lives and to people that they have known. Then how they have been inspired by it. I just think it’s fantastic.”

She pauses for a moment. “On the other side I wish it were all equal and that we didn’t have it. If we did not have to have October for this and we celebrated all people equally. It’s great that we do it, but I hope in time we don’t have to do it.”

Like we covered in the feature with Collins John, Yankey points again to education being key to solving this issue, especially within football. “I just think we have keep promoting, celebrating and educating. Look deep into your club and see who has played. There are so many footballers that you just do not even think of.”

Yankey is aware that it is a job for everyone. “We all, myself included, just need to do more in terms of telling the story of who have played for our clubs. Doing more to dig deep into the history of clubs and tell more of these stories.”

She’s thankful that the extremely successful Fulham LFC, which was sadly dissolved in 2006, is getting attention. “It’s great that you are not missing us out. If you’re there to educate and inspire young people and also adults, when we talk about Fulham Football Club we should never forget the female side of it. The young women/girls who need to be told the history, as well as the boys. There are so many young boys that love to research the history of football, especially black history, but will easily miss out the women’s team.”

The famous number 11 is spot on to mention that when discussing the history of Fulham, we should never forget that our club had the most successful team in the country at the turn of the 21st century.

It’s well known that our former chairman was ahead of the curve with the country’s first women’s professional football team. Al Fayed had watched the 1999 Women’s World Cup in US, witnessing crowds of up 95,000 filling the Rose Bowl in Los Angeles, he was convinced there was potential for the women’s game in England. The FA had promised a professional league and so Fulham began in haste, signing talent to spearhead their growth. Rachel Yankey was the first to sign up, becoming England’s first ever women’s professional footballer.

“Before the professional days you were just registered to a team each year and I was with Arsenal at the time. After the season finished I went to Canada to play and I expected to go back to Arsenal after that. But in Canada I had a conversation with Gary Mulkay [former head of the community office at Fulham] who had told me about Al-Fayed’s plans. The opportunity to play professionally, to train every day, even though Fulham were two leagues below Arsenal at the time. [Joining Fulham] was an opportunity I didn’t think I could turn down really.”

“We knew when we turned up, you could tell the other team were feeling like ‘it wasn’t fair.’ But we knew we had a job to do and get promoted.” Success was instant but they always knew it was work in progress. “Our first season, we won every game up until the FA Cup final when we lost to Arsenal. We changed a lot of things afterwards, but we did well to match them.” And that development was clear after that. “It was the best thing for us to lose, because it made us better and work harder. Losing that game really spurred us on and then the next season we won the treble.”

That year Yankey scored the second in a 2-1 victory over Doncaster Belles to win the 2002 Women’s FA Cup. Following that, the Whites secured another treble, this time securing the Premier League title but it was a short lived peak for Fulham LFC.

The promised FA-backed professional league never happened. It was unfortunate timing as the men’s team form had suffered towards the end of 2002. Al Fayed ended the professional status of the women’s team to focus on securing the Premier League status of the men’s team. But there is no ill feeling from Yankey. “The players totally understood, albeit we were absolutely gutted. The idea was to get into the professional league and that was cut, so the women’s team was losing a lot of money,” she says. “Al-Fayed, was right. He was doing the right thing for women’s football. Proving that if you could make a team of players professional they can battle against everything and become better.” She points to development of the squad as justification. “We had brought in some internationals from the first season, but not everyone was. By the third season, everybody bar one player had got at least one international cap. I think that proves how much improvement there was in the squad.”

Though after 2004 most of the former professionals had departed, the investment, development and professionalism in those few years at Fulham spread to the wider women’s game. England have now qualified for every World Cup since 2007, reaching the semi-finals in the last two. The squad in 2007 featured five former Fulham players. Rachel Yankey often featured during an international career that spanned 16 years. She ultimately won 129 caps for England, surpassing Peter Shilton in 2013 to become the most capped England footballer of all time. But this record has now been beaten five times by former national team mates.

Sadly, some of the Fulham contingent retired from football after losing professional status, “They lost the belief that there would be a professional league. So then a lot of the players thought, ‘well it’s time to go and focus on something else and a different career’.”

Yankey continued to have a hugely successful life within club football. She moved back to Arsenal, winning a further five league titles. When she talks about how things have changed for black women, specifically in football, there is a startling observation. “When I think back, Fulham had quite a few black players. Currently for England, there’s only Demi Stokes and Nikita Parris. If you look at the Super League now, there are minimal black players. It is certainly not representative of the country, especially in London. It’s scary to think of the talent we are missing.”

The women’s game might be thriving now, but it seems there’s still a lot of work to do off the pitch.

After reforming again 2014, Fulham LFC is now being delivered by the Fulham FC Foundation. To find details in how to join Fulham LFC or to follow their progress, you can find details on the Fulham FC website here.

If you would like to learn more about Black History Month or any other issues of inclusion and diversity, feel free to contact the Inclusion and Diversity officer Farrell Monk at any time.



https://www.fulhamsupporterstrust.com/news/2020/10/black-history-month-rachel-yankey/

Offline whitejc

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Re: Saturday Fulham Stuff - 31/10/20...
« Reply #4 on: October 30, 2020, 11:26:40 AM »
Four Fulham players ruled out of West Brom clash

Fulham manager Scott Parker has confirmed that four first-team players will miss his side’s clash with West Brom on Monday evening.

Neeskens Kebano, Kenny Tete, Terence Kongolo and Joachim Andersen are all in line to miss the visit of the Baggies in what is a huge game for both Fulham and Albion.

Speaking to West London Sport, Parker said that Kongolo is “still getting up to speed”, while Andersen is still not fit after sustaining ligament damage shortly after joining the Cottagers.

Regarding Andersen’s progress, Parker said, “He trained today (Thursday) albeit in a modified training session, and we’ll see where we are with him come Monday. Initially we were worried about him after the scan, but things have progressed well”.

Kebano will also miss the game after picking up an injury between Fulham’s games against Sheffield United and Crystal Palace.

These injuries will provide a boost for Baggies fans as their club goes in search of their first Premier League win of the season. Albion will get few better chances to win this season when they take on the league’s bottom side who have only picked up one point from their opening six games.

Karlan Grant will be looking to follow up his first Baggies goal with a second at the first time of asking when his new side take of Fulham. Grant was the hero as Albion drew 1-1 with Brighton during their last top-flight outing and Baggies fans will be hoping he can find the net again at Craven Cottage.

The game presents a huge opportunity for Albion and if they don’t manage a win then they could be waiting until December for their first three-point haul of the season, as their following games are against Tottenham and Manchester United.



https://www.westbromnews.co.uk/2020/10/30/four-fulham-players-ruled-out-of-west-brom-clash/

Offline whitejc

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Re: Saturday Fulham Stuff - 31/10/20...
« Reply #5 on: October 30, 2020, 11:37:20 AM »
Fulham v Albion match preview

Slaven Bilić’s Baggies travel to Craven Cottage on Monday evening looking for their first victory back in the Premier League following encouraging draws against Burnley and Brighton (ko 5.30pm).

Fulham

Their last time out

Fulham are yet to record a win since securing promotion back to the Premier League and they suffered defeat in their last game when Crystal Palace recorded a 2-1 triumph in west London.

Goals from Jaïro Riedewald and Wilfried Zaha gave the Cottagers an uphill task which was made more difficult when Aboubakar Kamara was dismissed towards the end of the game. Tom Cairney did net a stunning effort in injury time, but it came too late as Fulham’s wait for a win continued.

In the dugout

Scott Parker is currently leading his first full season as a Premier League manager having previously taken charge of the London-based side on a temporary basis back in 2019.

The former Chelsea and Spurs midfielder succeeded Claudio Ranieri in February that year but couldn’t prevent Fulham's relegation to the Championship. The 40-year-old became the permanent boss in May 2019 and was handed a two-year-contract. He secured an immediate return to the top flight via the play-offs last season, with Fulham beating rivals Brentford at Wembley.

Based on last term’s success, Parker will be confident his Fulham side can turn games in their favour over the course of the campaign.



One to watch

Since his move to the Cottagers on loan from German side RB Leipzig in the summer, Ademola Lookman has already proved to be a handful for Premier League defenders.

The 23-year-old scored on his first start for the club as he helped Fulham secure their first point of the season against Sheffield United and despite their recent 2-1 defeat to Palace, it could have been very different with Lookman twice hitting the post. He will no doubt be one to watch on Monday.

Our last meeting

Albion’s most recent game against the Cottagers ended in a 0-0 draw last season, but their last victory over Fulham came 10 years ago at The Hawthorns…


Stats

Albion

    The Baggies have found the net in three of their last four visits to Craven Cottage, losing one and drawing the rest.
    Defender Branislav Ivanović is unbeaten from the 10 Premier League matches he’s previously played against Fulham (W6, D4).
    Skipper Jake Livermore’s next game will be his 145th for the Baggies - the highest number of appearances he’s made for any club during his career.

Fulham

    Fulham hold a historically strong home record in league fixtures against Albion, with their last defeat coming in October 1967.
    Four out the five goals the Cottagers have scored this season have come during the second half of matches.
    Scott Parker’s men are yet to keep a clean sheet in the league the season.   

Head to head
Fulham wins   Draw   Albion wins
League   24   19   31
FA Cup   1   0   3
League Cup    2   2   2
Total   27   21   36

Our one to watch

Karlan Grant made the difference in Albion’s last match as a lethal finish with just seven minutes left to play earned a share of the spoils against Brighton on Monday.

The Baggies’ final summer signing demonstrated his eye for goal during his home debut against Burnley when he converted one of the few opportunities he had in the game, only for it to be ruled out by the linesman’s flag.

It could very much be a case of one chance, one goal for the 23-year-old who will be keen to add to his tally at Craven Cottage on Monday.



Follow the game

Gez Mulholland will be joined by once midfield-now-microphone maestro Andy Johnson to provide proudly partisan commentary and an expert insight for WBA Radio.

To listen live to Baggies-biased commentary on WBA Radio for free for every home and away match during the 2020/21 season all you have to do is sign up for a free My Albion account.

If you haven't already you can create your My Albion account here. Click Create Account or register quickly with your Facebook or Google account.

Live commentary starts from 15 minutes before kick-off and will be accessible through the live match centre or WBA TV.

If you have any issues registering or accessing your My Albion account please contact myalbion@wbafc.co.uk.

The game is also available to watch on Sky Sports Box Office.



https://www.wba.co.uk/news/fulham-v-albion-match-preview


Offline whitejc

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Re: Saturday Fulham Stuff - 31/10/20...
« Reply #6 on: October 30, 2020, 11:43:06 PM »
"As soon as racism affects the money, it will be gone" – Marvin Sordell and Liam Rosenior discuss racism in football

Twitter isn’t the place to find a constructive conversation on the Black Lives Matter movement. Instead, FFT had a frank discussion with Marvin Sordell and Liam Rosenior, ex-pros and now on the FA’s Inclusion Advisory Board

This feature first appeared in the August 2020 issue of FourFourTwo magazine. Subscribe today and for just a £9.99 quarterly fee

The Black Lives Matter campaign may have morphed from worthy cause into political grenade in the space of a few weeks, but its overriding mantra should always remain at the heart of any discussion. However, as statues have been toppled and peaceful protests have been overshadowed by retaliation, it’s hard to shake the feeling that ulterior matters have distracted from the original, simple message.

But cutting through all the noise is like cycling through a bog: it’s hard work, and you’re going to get stuck. That’s why FFT enlisted former pros Marvin Sordell and Liam Rosenior for a Zoom chat about the realities of life from an ethnic minority background, and where football can improve. Topically, Rosenior went to Colston’s Primary School in Bristol – (formerly) named after Edward Colston, the 17th-century slave trader whose statue was, in June, pulled down by protesters and then thrown into the harbour.

In May, both were among seven additions to the FA’s Inclusion Advisory Board. While retirement has taken the two former players down very different directions – Rosenior, 36, into the position of specialist first-team coach at Derby; Sordell, 29, now a producer, writer and multi-skilled head honcho of ONEIGHTY Productions – their life experiences make for essential reading.

We all have much to learn...

FFT: How did you both come into your roles on the FA’s Inclusion Advisory Board?

ROSENIOR: I’ve known Paul Elliott [chair of the board] for a long time and was honoured when he asked me to be part of it. I’ve always wanted to influence things in what I do, so being a positive role model, as a footballer or coach, means a lot to me. It’s a huge honour to have a voice in how we’re going to take our game forward in this country.

SORDELL: I was quite hesitant at first. I didn’t really know what impact I’d be able to have, and whether it was going to be a token role. I’ve spoken out about the FA, UEFA and FIFA a lot over time – not just on their approaches to racism but other subjects that are personal to me – and been pretty critical. Eventually, I thought I’d be a hypocrite if I didn’t take the opportunity. If you want to make change, you have to be a part of change.

FFT: Liam, how did you feel when you watched Edward Colston’s statue coming down?

MS: Did you know about that history when you were at the school?

LR: I did. Since I was a child, there have been conversations about him and the things he represented in Bristol. My family comes from Sierra Leone in west Africa. I don’t know the number but I believe around 80 per cent of slaves were either transported from or came through there, and my dad’s ancestors were slaves. As a child, though, I was fortunate to be made aware and proud of both my white and black heritage. Seeing the statue brought down actually sparked something in me a lot stronger than I thought it would. Speaking to friends who went to the same school – some white, some black – they were all pretty happy about it. It has sparked some unbelievable debates that we haven’t had for a long time about where we are in this country right now. Whether we like it or not, slavery has played a huge part in the UK and America. It’s funny, because my grandmother lives in Hull, where the William Wilberforce [a leader of the movement to abolish slavery] museum is, and we would visit there regularly. It was my mum who was most enthusiastic about me learning about my black heritage. She’s told me stories about people literally spitting at her as she pushed me in the street. Education is so important for combating racism right now. It creates an opportunity to have empathy for other individuals who don’t have the same background.

FFT: Marvin, how was it growing up in London with a very different demographic? Did being black ever feel like a disadvantage?

MS: I can’t lie: it did. One thing that people may not understand is the microaggressions that exist. They might think racist incidents are just one-offs, but if that was the case then maybe they wouldn’t affect us so much. I’ve had a wide range of experiences, and being a footballer was my escape from the world. Society expects certain things of us, but when I went out on a football pitch, it was different. “You’re not like the rest of them,” is what I’d often hear people say. When I present myself as an intelligent, thoughtful and articulate person, I’m considered ‘different’ as a black person, as opposed to just being myself.

LR: That’s a really good point – it’s the kind of unconscious bias that goes unchallenged. It’s very difficult to explain what that feels like. If I first meet someone or speak on the television, they say to me with surprise, “You speak so well”. I’ve even been told I “speak white” by other black people.

MS: I have as well!

LR: There’s a preconceived idea that, based on the colour of your skin, you’re meant to be a certain way. We’re pigeonholing people. We can speak about overt racism, where it’s in your face, but it’s far more than that.

FFT: What do you both think of the Black Lives Matter activity over recent months? Why do we need it?

MS: When we talk about ‘Black Lives Matter’, that’s just it – it’s a statement on its own. It’s only because it doesn’t have the word ‘too’ at the end that some people feel triggered. Sometimes I fall down the rabbit hole of checking comments on Twitter, and it’s very strange. You’ll see things like, “It’s so PC” and, “Why is everything now racist?” However, it’s not that everything is now racist – it’s that our whole society was built on racial bias. Now everything’s coming to light and it’s too much change for some people. It’s not that it’s PC or left-wing. If you took individual situations and asked people, “Is this all right?” then we would start to appreciate how many harmful things exist. Take the Colston statue: I had absolutely no idea about his background in slavery, and yet this situation has brought that to light now. People speak about Black Lives Matter as an organisation, but it shouldn’t be anything more than a phrase. It’s people just saying, “Please treat me like I matter”. That’s it.

LR: The people who are against it have not lived those experiences. How can you expect people to understand something they don’t have any comprehension of? It’s not their fault. What we really need to be fearful of is people wanting to be more politically correct, and being fearful of saying the wrong thing. We want open conversations. They may be uncomfortable, but that’s OK. It’s better than saying, “I don’t have any knowledge about this, I don’t understand why black people feel their lives don’t matter, I’m not going to say anything and I just think it’s wrong”.

FFT: Have either of you had discussions with former team-mates about these issues in the past?

LR: I’ve spoken to players throughout my career, white and black, about the use of the n-word in rap music and what it represents. The question has always come: “Why is it OK for a black person to say it but not a white person?” It’s because 400 years of history are connected with that word.

MS: It’s incredible that’s even a question, to be honest...

LR: Actually, to me it’s not – because where is slavery in our curriculum? It’s not. So, if you are white and go through school, you have no understanding at all of what happened or where that word originates. It’s not people’s fault. Actually, I liked getting that question because it was then: ‘OK, we can talk about this’. Without asking it – being unafraid to be perceived as racist – that conversation would never have happened. Liam, what does it mean to be among the next generation of black coaches? Why aren’t there as many as there should be?

LR: If I’m being honest, I feel like I’ve been misunderstood at times during my career; I’ve been accused of having a chip on my shoulder for asking questions on coaching, when white players would ask the same and it would be seen as a positive thing. There are so many intangible things that you can affect, being a black coach. We don’t have enough coaches who fully understand the 40 per cent of our players from black or ethnic minority backgrounds: their culture, body language, unsaid cues about how they are feeling. I feel a lot of players have been misunderstood on a cultural level. Obviously I want to reach the very top, manage in the Champions League and win lots of titles, but I also want to help develop players from all backgrounds. I want to have an empathetic understanding of who they are, so that I can make them the best player they can be. Are there enough black coaches doing their badges, applying for jobs? Are we losing prospective candidates who are put off?

LR: Completely. I know a black player who won the Champions League, played for their country over 100 times – he’s a huge name. He once asked me what I wanted to do when I finished playing, so I told him. He laughed and said, “Don’t bother. What’s the point? No one is going to give you a job.” That has been the attitude of players for a long time. It motivates me because I want to change it. I want to be visible and seen as a young, English, black coach who is successful. Then maybe other young players will see me and think, ‘I want to do what he does one day’.

FFT: What’s your take on the Rooney Rule when it comes to Football League hires? At least one BAME candidate must be interviewed for all managerial and coaching positions.

MS: It’s something that gets bypassed at the moment. What I’d like people to understand more about the Rooney Rule is that, as black people, we’re not looking for handouts. We don’t want to be given jobs for the sake of it. The problem is just getting into the room. In most industries, people employ people who are similar to them. If those who lead clubs are white men, they’re more likely to employ white men. If they’re not told to look outside their circle, then it’s not going to happen. The cycle will continue.

LR: I actually interviewed for a first-team job last season. I don’t know if it was part of the Rooney Rule or if I was selected voluntarily, but I do know it gave this club a different idea of what they might be searching for. It gave me an unbelievable experience, as a young, black coach interviewing for a manager’s job at a high level, and I think it changed their perceptions of me. I didn’t get the job, but it was a great experience for all concerned. I’m still in contact with some of the people who interviewed me, who were really impressed with what I had to say. From my experience, interviewing people from outside the customary background of qualified names lifts everyone’s experiences. Straight away, you’re getting a different and more diverse perspective. In a new scheme, six BAME coaches will be given 23-month work placements at EFL clubs each season. How do you both feel about that?

MS: Why do we need the placements? That’s the key question, isn’t it. There’s a reason why positive discrimination can be justified. That isn’t down to someone like me. I don’t choose these things; they have just happened during history. Now, this is what’s happening off the back of it. LR: I think many positive things will happen off the back of those placements. There have been studies of really successful businesses – which weren’t actually based on diversity; it was just a case of ‘OK, these sectors are doing particularly well and outperforming their competitors: why?’ – and the common denominator was often the diversity of their boardrooms. It’s not just about seeing more black faces in the media or in a dugout on matchdays; it’s about giving supporters the best possible product, too. And where is that product? It’s in the players. Raheem Sterling once said that he didn’t have many coaches he could relate to when he was growing up. Can you imagine how many players like him, who didn’t quite have his ability, that we’ve lost over the years because they didn’t have a coach who understood their challenges? Diversity is proven to be more successful in the long term. MS: It’s about more diversity in the sense of thinking and mindfulness. If you appoint the same people all of the time, you’re going to get the same results. You’re never going to move forward, are you?

LR: You’ll have the same conversations. The only way society really progresses is through challenge and change. I’m a coach, so how do I improve? I go and watch others, because I need to see their perspective and ideas. If I just have the same idea of football for the next 20 years, I’m not going to be successful. The game is constantly evolving, but that is the same in every sector. As men from ethnic minority backgrounds, have you ever been worried about visiting certain places? MS: Yes – whether it was in football grounds or countries to play matches, or even going on holiday. A friend was talking about going somewhere on his stag do, and I had to say, “I’m not sure – let me see if they even have black people there.” If not, that would have been incredibly difficult. He was a friend, but he couldn’t walk in my shoes. If I went over to America now, there are only certain places I would go to comfortably.

MS: My wife was born in New York but grew up in Orlando, so we’ve frequently made the four-hour drive from Orlando to Miami. One time, we were absolutely starving so stopped off halfway at a burger joint. As we walked in to what must have been around 100 people, the whole place just stopped. We felt really uncomfortable and decided to leave straight away, but as we went to drive off, two guys stood right in front of the car, trying to stop us. I had to drive as if we were going to run them over to get out. In Miami once, I couldn’t find my passport, so I went to the police station to file a report and apply for a new one. I said to the officer, “Excuse me, I’m from England” – at which point she said, “You can’t be” and closed the shutter on me. These are everyday occurrences for people that should be unbelievable, and yet they’re not. For years we’ve had to live in acceptance of that and work around it, and I think what the Black Lives Matter movement represents is saying, ‘No, this is unacceptable’. The more that people can be empathetic, the better it is for society.

FFT: Marvin, you were on the pitch during that infamous England Under-21 game against Serbia in 2012, when monkey chants were everywhere. What do you remember of that night in Krusevac?

MS: There’s a lot to it – it felt like I was in the middle of a war zone. To be honest, I’ve never looked back at any of the footage. Why, I’m not sure – maybe, subconsciously, I just don’t want to go back. We actually qualified for the U21 Euros that night, so the celebrations were completely tarnished by all the scenes that happened before, during and after the match. I can remember at the time thinking, ‘This is insane’. You’re not surprised by the monkey chants, though, because they had been happening for years. That said, there are some places in England where you always felt, ‘I’m going to get abused today’.

LR: I represented England U21s a few times, and went through a similar experience when we played a group game against Serbia at the 2007 Euros in Holland. But what we need to do is be really honest about where we are as a country. When I was 17, I went on trial with West Ham and stayed in digs. I went for a walk to explore the local area, and outside a sports shop there was a photograph of the England team with its black players’ faces stoned out. I’m actually tired of talking about what happens when we play games in other countries, because we haven’t got our own house in order. It’s easy to deflect, because there are other dangerous and covert forms of racism in England. I don’t know how Marvin feels about it, but overt racism just doesn’t affect me any more. When I was five, I saw my dad have bananas thrown at him. When I was eight, I was called a monkey in a park. When I became a player, I got called the n-word and was sent off for retaliating. I’ve experienced so much of that, I don’t get upset about it now.

MS: If someone called me a monkey to my face, I’d be annoyed but I’d just think, ‘Well, that person is racist’. It’s very simple in that sense. If people are manipulating situations or reacting differently to me because of my skin colour, that’s different. If I’m being held back because of it, that is hugely frustrating. It’s so hard to call that out, too.

LR: As a black man, it’s more hurtful if you’re walking down the street and then an old lady crosses the road. It’s more hurtful when you walk into a shop with your kids...

MS: …and people follow you around, thinking you might steal something.

LR: I’m 36 years old, and that’s more hurtful than anyone calling you a monkey. That old lady who crosses the road maybe isn’t a bad person, but her prejudices are so ingrained.

MS: It infuriates me. It’s a narrative that has been written for us – that we are a threat. That’s something we always have to contend with, and bend to society. I was speaking to my wife recently, who is white, about some of the things I’ve had to do that I’ve not even thought about. If I’m walking past someone, I think I’d better smile, so they don’t think I’ll do something to them. I see people and take my hood down, so they don’t automatically think I’ll stab them. If I’ve got my hands in my pockets, I’ve got to take them out, so it doesn’t look like I’m about to rob someone. I’m not that type of person, and never have been, yet it’s so deeply ingrained in society that it’s even ingrained in the way I behave. There is, however, the issue of how UEFA deals with racist situations. Where do you stand in the debate about whether players should walk off when they happen?

MS: I think they should – and it’s not because that makes a statement to those up in the stands. What it does is create a problem for football: ‘What are you going to do now?’ If a team like England walk off in a European Championship qualifier, what happens then? They haven’t completed the match because of racism. Either they punish England, heavily punish the opposition, or try to brush it under the carpet and replay the match. Suddenly, sponsors will say, ‘Hang on, we aren’t getting a match here’. As we’ve seen recently with coronavirus, sponsors only care about money: if there’s no football, then they’ll pull all their funding. If countries take a stand and refuse to play while racism is taking place inside the stadiums, that automatically creates an issue for governing bodies to stamp down on very firmly. As soon as racism affects the money – I tell you now – it will be gone very quickly.

LR: You’re 100 per cent right. I don’t want to sound like a broken record, but we can’t keep talking about these short-term issues where a team receives a fine. It’s not going to make a difference in the long run. It sounds wrong – because when you’re on the end of overt racism, it can be so hurtful – but the problems aren’t with that minority of people. We live in a society where things aren’t fair; let’s fix that and deal with the minority after. What makes you both feel optimistic about the future?

MS: I think the next generation are different. They’ve been exposed to so much in their lives already – many different types of people, emotions, opinions – that it’s just a different way of living. People say, ‘I don’t see colour’, but I think that generation allows people to be who they are, it seems. I’ve seen children challenging their parents, which is tough, but they could be the ones who make that huge jump in years to come.

LR: I still have a big belief that the majority of people on this planet are good. I want to do my bit for my kids, and – as Marvin said – it’s all about them. In football, I’ve looked at what the likes of Marcus Rashford and Sterling have achieved in a very short space of time. When Raheem came into football, the way he was covered in the media was a total disgrace. Everything was so negative – this so-called bling culture – and it was challenged by Raheem himself. It takes that prejudice from an unconscious place to a conscious one. For me, there are so many positive role models – black and white – who just want the best for society.



https://www.fourfourtwo.com/features/as-soon-as-racism-affects-the-money-it-will-be-gone-marvin-sordell-and-liam-rosenior-discuss-racism-in-football

Offline whitejc

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Re: Saturday Fulham Stuff - 31/10/20...
« Reply #7 on: October 30, 2020, 11:44:22 PM »
Scott Parker insists Fulham are improving despite poor start

 Fulham manager Scott Parker admits he is "bitterly disappointed" with his club's current position but insists the side is improving.

The Cottagers suffered their fifth defeat from their opening six Premier League games at home to Crystal Palace last weekend, despite recording the majority of the possession.

Parker is aware his side need to make changes, but insists Fulham are moving in the right direction ahead of Monday's crucial game against West Brom.

"I constantly see improvements. There were a lot of good things against Crystal Palace that I see and that I have seen in games, some real positives," the 40-year-old said.

"But there has been 10, 11 new players that have come into the building and a lot of young players.

"I think we've brought players here that have massive potential but, in saying that, don't have a lot of Premier League experience. This is constant improving, constant chipping away trying to improve, trying to get better as individuals and as a team.

"We are disappointed that we've only got one point on the board, bitterly disappointed, none of us are happy about that. There's also elements that I am happy with and I feel like we're moving in the right direction really."

Despite being rooted to the foot of the Premier League table, Fulham could move clear of the relegation zone if results go their way and they beat 17th-placed West Brom when the sides meet at Craven Cottage.

When asked about the game, Parker said: "Big game, of course. Every game for us is a big game.

"The competition of where we both are in the league and I think Slaven (West Brom manager Slaven Bilic) will be the same in terms of where he sees his team this year, and where he's going to be in and about is probably where we are.

"This is a real big game for both of us because you want to try and take points off each other really, so of course.

"Every game is massive and it's going to be massive for us this year, but I think this game has a little bit extra."



https://www.sportsmole.co.uk/football/fulham/news/scott-parker-insists-fulham-are-improving-despite-poor-start_420397.html

Offline whitejc

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Re: Saturday Fulham Stuff - 31/10/20...
« Reply #8 on: October 30, 2020, 11:45:24 PM »
Scott Parker confident Fulham are ‘moving in the right direction’

Fulham manager Scott Parker admits he is “bitterly disappointed” with his club’s current position but insists the side is improving.

The Cottagers suffered their fifth defeat from their opening six Premier League games at home to Crystal Palace last weekend, despite recording the majority of the possession.

Parker is aware his side need to make changes, but insists Fulham are moving in the right direction ahead of Monday’s crucial game against West Brom.

“I constantly see improvements. There were a lot of good things against Crystal Palace that I see and that I have seen in games, some real positives,” the 40-year-old said.

“But there has been 10, 11 new players that have come into the building and a lot of young players.

“I think we’ve brought players here that have massive potential but, in saying that, don’t have a lot of Premier League experience. This is constant improving, constant chipping away trying to improve, trying to get better as individuals and as a team.

“We are disappointed that we’ve only got one point on the board, bitterly disappointed, none of us are happy about that. There’s also elements that I am happy with and I feel like we’re moving in the right direction really.”

Despite being rooted to the foot of the Premier League table, Fulham could move clear of the relegation zone if results go their way and they beat 17th-placed West Brom when the sides meet at Craven Cottage.

When asked about the game, Parker said: “Big game, of course. Every game for us is a big game.

“The competition of where we both are in the league and I think Slaven (West Brom manager Slaven Bilic) will be the same in terms of where he sees his team this year, and where he’s going to be in and about is probably where we are.

“This is a real big game for both of us because you want to try and take points off each other really, so of course.

“Every game is massive and it’s going to be massive for us this year, but I think this game has a little bit extra.”



https://www.fourfourtwo.com/news/scott-parker-confident-fulham-are-moving-in-the-right-direction-1604066604000


Offline whitejc

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Re: Saturday Fulham Stuff - 31/10/20...
« Reply #9 on: October 31, 2020, 12:02:34 AM »
Scott Parker insists Fulham are ‘moving in the right direction’ despite poor start

They sit bottom of the table, but Parker’s side face a key Monday night clash against fellow newly-promoted outfit West Brom

Fulham manager Scott Parker admits he is "bitterly disappointed" with his club's current position but insists the side is improving.

The Cottagers suffered their fifth defeat from their opening six Premier League games at home to Crystal Palace last weekend, despite recording the majority of the possession.

Parker is aware his side need to make changes, but insists Fulham are moving in the right direction ahead of Monday's crucial game against West Brom.

"I constantly see improvements. There were a lot of good things against Crystal Palace that I see and that I have seen in games, some real positives," the 40-year-old said.

"But there has been 10, 11 new players that have come into the building and a lot of young players.

"I think we've brought players here that have massive potential but, in saying that, don't have a lot of Premier League experience. This is constant improving, constant chipping away trying to improve, trying to get better as individuals and as a team.

"We are disappointed that we've only got one point on the board, bitterly disappointed, none of us are happy about that. There's also elements that I am happy with and I feel like we're moving in the right direction really."

Despite being rooted to the foot of the Premier League table, Fulham could move clear of the relegation zone if results go their way and they beat 17th-placed West Brom when the sides meet at Craven Cottage.

When asked about the game, Parker said: "Big game, of course. Every game for us is a big game.

"The competition of where we both are in the league and I think Slaven (West Brom manager Slaven Bilic) will be the same in terms of where he sees his team this year, and where he's going to be in and about is probably where we are.

"This is a real big game for both of us because you want to try and take points off each other really, so of course.

"Every game is massive and it's going to be massive for us this year, but I think this game has a little bit extra."

PA



https://www.independent.co.uk/sport/football/premier-league/fulham-news-scott-parker-results-fixtures-west-brom-epl-table-b1452432.html

Offline whitejc

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Re: Saturday Fulham Stuff - 31/10/20...
« Reply #10 on: October 31, 2020, 12:03:37 AM »
Fulham boss Parker admits he faces tough choice for West Brom game

Scott Parker admits he has a tough call who to leave out from Mario Lemina, Andre-Frank Anguissa and Harrison Reed against West Brom on Monday.

One of the three midfielders is going to be on the bench against Albion, with the Fulham head coach agreeing he has a big decision to make.

“That’s one part of the pitch where we’re very good on numbers, and we have numbers at centre-half as well,” he said.

“It’s down to me to pick the best combination for certain games to win games.

“They’re fighting each other; there’s a lot of competition for those places by the three players.”

Reed was recalled as a second-half substitute in the 2-0 home defeat by Crystal Palace last weekend following injury.

He replaced Lemina, while Anguissa was hooked in favour of Abou Kamara.

The latter lasted only 20 minutes before getting sent off for a foul on Eberechi Eze and is suspended.

Parker has fingers crossed they won’t concede first against West Brom, as they have in five out of the six Premier League matches so far.

The one occasion they took the lead, it produced Whites only point – against Sheffield United.

“If you score first it gives us something to hang on to, and history tells us that too,” added Parker.

“Psychologically it plays a part and we understand and are working on that.

“Last season, if we fell behind we could go on to score two or three, but this is a very different, much harder league”.



https://www.westlondonsport.com/fulham/fulham-boss-parker-admits-he-faces-tough-choice-for-west-brom-game

Offline whitejc

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Re: Saturday Fulham Stuff - 31/10/20...
« Reply #11 on: October 31, 2020, 12:09:59 AM »
'Face Up. Front up. Don't hide': Scott Parker has a plan to lift struggling Fulham off the bottom of the Premier League table... and former Tottenham and West Ham midfielder insists he is 'immune' to pressure as he navigates relegation battle this season

    Fulham are bottom of the Premier League and are still looking for their first win
    Scott Parker is not panicking and has a plan to turn his side's fortunes around
    He wants his players to show themselves and to 'face up' to the challenge ahead
    Parker is keen to harness the culture and is not one for regular dressing downs
    Fulham take on fellow promoted side West Brom on Monday in a huge game

Managing in the Premier League is hard. Doing it during a global health crisis is even harder. At Fulham, Scott Parker cannot even talk to all his players in one room at the same time.

'I have to take two or three team meetings rather than one as we are only allowed a certain number of players in one room,' he said.

'We haven't got anywhere at the training ground big enough for everyone to be socially distanced.'


Scott Parker has opened up on his plan to keep Fulham's Premier League status this season
 

Fulham finished fourth last season, were promoted in the play-offs but are struggling right now


Every manager loses his temper with players occasionally. It must be exhausting to have to do it three times instead of once.

'Yeah, I know,' smiles Parker. 'As a player here you just have to be clever about who you are going into one of my meetings with.

'If someone has played badly at the weekend, just don't go in the same room as that person!' Parker is belly laughing by the end and it is good to see. Regular ear-bashings are not his style, anyway, but even if they were, he does not expect to reach that point often this season.

Fulham are at the bottom of the Premier League but you would not know it. 'I feel brilliant, to be fair,' he told Sportsmail on Thursday.

'Pressure is something I have had since I was a 10-year-old on a McDonald's advert.

'Whether it was Under 12s football on a Sunday where everyone is looking and saying, "Oh, that's the kid" or making my debut for Charlton at 16, then moving to Chelsea for £10million.

'I have kind of become immune to it. Of course, there are times when it's hard but when I was 10 and walking into school and kids were being rough to me, that was hard, too.

'So you understand it and you try to stay level and that's the biggest part of me. I know what my mechanisms are and they are simple. Hard work. Face up. Front up. Don't hide. Especially now while we are having a bad run.

'The reality is that we are not playing well. So what do we need to do? How can we improve? Can we work harder? Can I stay in the office longer? Can I be on the training ground more? That's always been my go-to and normally I end up coming out the other side.'


Speaking to Sportsmail, Parker was able to laugh and dismissed the notion of pressure
 

Fulham go into Monday night's game against West Brom desperate for a first win this season


Parker has only just turned 40 and this is his second full season as a manager. Last season's promotion via the play-offs was a significant achievement and already remaining in the top flight looks like a big ask. Fulham have a single point ahead of Monday's home game with West Bromwich Albion.

The former England midfielder knows his team must improve. There is not an awful lot of top-flight experience in the Fulham side. Parker once said football was only 20 per cent about ability. The rest is in the head.

'I do feel like we need to improve on that but these are good players and they will,' he nodded.

'Setbacks will come and the bumps will come. They did last year. But being brutally honest we need to improve on how we deal with that and I am sure any one of the players would say that is a big driver coming from me.

'I do think you can train it, though. You just have to try. We all go out on the grass and train the left foot or someone's crossing or shooting but we lose sight of the other stuff. But it's during adverse times that you can really learn and grow. We need to do that.'

A chat with Crystal Palace boss Roy Hodgson after his team beat Fulham 2-1 last weekend was helpful.
 

Parker is convinced that he can harness results from a group that has struggled badly so far



'He was very complimentary of how we did things last year and this year,' revealed Parker. 'He just said "stick with it" and "keep believing in what you are doing". That was nice.'

Less helpful was a tweet from Fulham co-owner Tony Khan after a home defeat by Aston Villa in September in which he apologised for the performance of Parker's team.

Parker was not happy and said so.

'That has settled down fine,' said Parker.

'We have owners who care about Fulham and have spent a lot of money. Tony's comments were coming from a good place.

'He had his say and I had mine and it is what it is. My point was nobody had to apologise for the performance.

'Tony is in charge of the other bits and if he wants to apologise for that it's fine but he doesn't need to apologise for the performance because if you do that, it's because of lack of effort and that will never be the case for one of my teams.

'So we move on and realise more than ever that we must stick together as a club, a team and as fans.

'There will be a lot of people out there wanting to chip away at us and break us. We need to stick together.

'It will be tough this year. I took over after Claudio Ranieri left and the club was in pieces. It was distant in all areas. The team, the fans, the group. Results can do that. A big driver for me was to get everyone back together and that to a large part is why we were successful last year.
 

Fulham owner Khan issued an apology on Twitter after the club's heavy defeat vs Aston Villa




'Not many relegated teams come straight back up. Look at Stoke, Huddersfield. It's difficult.

'Much of that success was from our togetherness. Sure there are times when you come in on a Monday morning and have to tell the players that something wasn't acceptable.

'I realise that I am trying to drive 30 men with different egos and personalities. I need them out there on a Saturday giving the best they can.

'So creating an environment and a culture is about getting the balance right.

'Everyone saw the Brentford game in the play-off final but that was just the end of it. What happened before was what got us here.

'It has to be the same this year. One million per cent we have to stick together and I am sure we will do that.'

Fulham beat Brentford 2-1 in extra-time at Wembley. Most memorable was Parker's emotional post-match interview during which he paid tribute to his wife, Carly, and their four sons for putting up with the baggage that a football manager inevitably brings home every night. During our conversation on Zoom, Parker was as he is always is. Smiling, engaged and great company. So is he managing to be the same at home?

'Yeah, it's all good,' he said. 'What I said was just how I felt. It was the emotion of a long, hard season. The people closest to you are the ones that see all sides of it. The end part makes it all worthwhile.
 

Tom Cairney has been a key part of the success under Parker but things are tough right now



'It's no different for me than it is for any other parent out there working. The pressures and sacrifices are just the same.

'But the family are enjoying the Premier League, I think. The boys often tell me they would like more points. But I would like them even more than they would.'

Parker's playing career took him from Charlton to Chelsea and then on to Newcastle, West Ham, Tottenham and Fulham.

He began his coaching life at Spurs with the Under 18s but the long-term objective was always clear.

'My No 1 aim was to be at first-team level and manage my team,' he said. 'I went to Tottenham to cut my teeth and be on the training field. For my development as a coach I needed that.

'I had dealt with a lot as a player and felt accomplished but on the coaching side of it, I wasn't. I didn't want to jump into first-team football and be learning my trade on the job.

'I didn't want to be making big mistakes in front of seasoned pros. I know how ruthless the game can be.'

With that last truth in mind, it feels a little as though Parker will need some results soon if the ground is not to start to shift a little beneath his feet.


His playing career saw him play for a number of London clubs, including West Ham (pictured)
 

The former Tottenham youth coach knows he has to innovate to keep this group in the league


He is realistic about that and knows exactly what Fulham's horizons are this season.

'If we finish the season fourth from bottom, that will be a huge achievement given that we were fourth in the Championship last season,' he said.

As he looks to achieve that, Parker knows he must innovate. The bonds he wants to strengthen usually come from packed dressing rooms, team buses and squad nights out. The pandemic has removed those options.

'We can't even go out for a team meal,' Parker said. 'It's out of the question. That's the world we are in. But everyone out there is in the same position. No way will we feel sorry for ourselves. Being flexible is part of it and trying to find new ways to push boundaries and keep everything moving is the thing.'

As he said himself: Face Up. Front up. Don't hide. It sounds like a decent motto.



https://www.dailymail.co.uk/sport/football/article-8899013/Scott-Parker-opens-plan-Fulham-Premier-League.html