Author Topic: Old Sod's Army  (Read 2325 times)

Offline bog

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Old Sod's Army
« on: July 26, 2010, 04:53:57 PM »
With time we, sometimes, forgive former managers and players for some misdemeanors. However, I can never forgive Vic Buckingham for selling Graham Leggat to Birmingham. Okay he did buy Allan Clarke from Walsall....but to show the door to my second best ever player I have seen in Fulham shirt was unforgivable. Could play in any of the 5 forward postions could Graham and also score from any of them.....   

TonyGilroy

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Re: Old Sod's Army
« Reply #1 on: July 26, 2010, 04:57:14 PM »

Leggatt did nothing after he left us to demonstrate that Buckingham was wrong.

One of my favourite Fulham players but he was well past his best.

Offline Lighthouse

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Re: Old Sod's Army
« Reply #2 on: July 26, 2010, 05:40:41 PM »
Players who leave Fulham often find it hard to re capture the form that made them worth a look in the first place. Of coarse there are exceptions to the rule. McDonald and Marsh and Clarke.

But an awful lot seem to have missed the Thames air when they leave.


Offline Peabody

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Re: Old Sod's Army
« Reply #3 on: July 26, 2010, 07:48:17 PM »
Have to agree with you Bog, VB made to many changes to quickly. I was mortified when he let Rodney go to QPR. I was even more agrieved when he let Jimmy Langley go, also to QPR. In fact, that was the one and only time that felt disillusioned with FFC. It did'nt last long though and despite what Tony says, I feel we could have got some more out of Graham Leggatt , I am convinced that he was so upset at being transferred that it affected his game.

Offline bog

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Re: Old Sod's Army
« Reply #4 on: July 27, 2010, 11:15:11 AM »
Morning peabody. Just saw your reply. I think you are right about Graham losing his love of the game. Buckingham did bring a few good ones in, Les Barrett a wondeful player. I think that it was Dave Sexton's coaching that got him out of the mire. I always wonder what would have happened if Serxton would have stayed at the club.

TonyGilroy

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Re: Old Sod's Army
« Reply #5 on: July 27, 2010, 11:28:11 AM »

Sexton moved on to Arsenal, I think. He was that good a coach.

It's been traditional to blame Buckingham and it's clear that he was in no way a success but our problem in the 60s was Trinder.

Alan Clarke aside we bought no one of note. The great players from the late 50s/early 60s grew old and were gradually replaced by free transfers, has beens and kids. Relegation was inevitable and that it was X2 demonstrates just how far we'd deteriorated.

Trinder operated on a lower league budget and refused investment offers until too late when he took it from crooks.

I don't think Trinder was evil but he was old fashioned, small minded, naive and unambitious and that's why the club declined.



Offline Peabody

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Re: Old Sod's Army
« Reply #6 on: July 27, 2010, 11:43:56 AM »
Tony, it is not only me that was less than impressed with Buckingham. I quote from the 1987 book Fulham A Complete Record. "Yet Buckinghams tenure was not a happy one and relegation from Div was a constant threat". They also state " He tried to make too many changes too soonand suceeded in upsetting almost everyone".

Offline Tonywa

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Re: Old Sod's Army
« Reply #7 on: July 27, 2010, 11:49:32 AM »
But we were nearly always cheapskates and for that we can blame the board.  Although he proved not to be that bad a buy, I believe that when we purchased Bobby Howfield from Watford he could not even command a place in their first team.  So as a top division club, we were buying a player from the bottom division, who was in his late twenties and who could not get into a mediocre Fourth Division side.  Incredible when you think about it.

TW

TonyGilroy

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Re: Old Sod's Army
« Reply #8 on: July 27, 2010, 01:45:38 PM »

I'm not praising Buckingham merely saying that he wasn't the main source of our problems. Bobby Robson couldn't turn us round and he proved to be a somewhat decent manager.

There are two rumours about Bobby Howfield. The one that I hope is true is that he left us to be a place kicker (correct term?) in American football and was a success.

The other is that he killed someone in America and got a life sentence.


TonyGilroy

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Re: Old Sod's Army
« Reply #9 on: July 27, 2010, 01:48:18 PM »
But we were nearly always cheapskates and for that we can blame the board.  Although he proved not to be that bad a buy, I believe that when we purchased Bobby Howfield from Watford he could not even command a place in their first team.  So as a top division club, we were buying a player from the bottom division, who was in his late twenties and who could not get into a mediocre Fourth Division side.  Incredible when you think about it.

TW

Alan Clarke was, literally, the only notable incoming transfer throughout the 60s. The only player we paid any decent money for and whose best days were still ahead of him.

One only. In 10 years.

Thank you, Tommy Trinder.

Fernhurst

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Re: Old Sod's Army
« Reply #10 on: July 27, 2010, 01:50:44 PM »
 :037: The other is that he killed someone in America and got a life sentence.  :037:

BLIMEY.... DOES ANYONE KNOW IF THAT ONE IS TRUE????

Offline HatterDon

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Re: Old Sod's Army
« Reply #11 on: July 27, 2010, 01:54:07 PM »

I'm not praising Buckingham merely saying that he wasn't the main source of our problems. Bobby Robson couldn't turn us round and he proved to be a somewhat decent manager.

There are two rumours about Bobby Howfield. The one that I hope is true is that he left us to be a place kicker (correct term?) in American football and was a success.

The other is that he killed someone in America and got a life sentence.

Howfield did, indeed, become one of the first "soccer-style kickers" to make it in professional pointy football over here. As for the murdering someone, that's new to me. According to my friend wiki

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bobby_Howfield

he became a banker [not quite a murderer, but close] in Denver and lives near there now at age 73. I was actually a little stunned to see what a goal machine he was in England. 9 goals in 25 first team matches would sound pretty good to me about now.


Offline CorkedHat

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Re: Old Sod's Army
« Reply #12 on: July 27, 2010, 02:06:04 PM »

I'm not praising Buckingham merely saying that he wasn't the main source of our problems. Bobby Robson couldn't turn us round and he proved to be a somewhat decent manager.

There are two rumours about Bobby Howfield. The one that I hope is true is that he left us to be a place kicker (correct term?) in American football and was a success.

The other is that he killed someone in America and got a life sentence.

Howfield did, indeed, become one of the first "soccer-style kickers" to make it in professional pointy football over here. As for the murdering someone, that's new to me. According to my friend wiki

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bobby_Howfield

he became a banker [not quite a murderer, but close] in Denver and lives near there now at age 73. I was actually a little stunned to see what a goal machine he was in England. 9 goals in 25 first team matches would sound pretty good to me about now.



It's a pity he didn't murder Trinder  :028:

RidgeRider

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Re: Old Sod's Army
« Reply #13 on: July 27, 2010, 02:52:54 PM »
I love these threads and look forward to each one as their connection with the past creates a deeper bond with the club for some of us newbies.

Appreciate it gents and DO carry on!

Offline Tonywa

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Re: Old Sod's Army
« Reply #14 on: July 27, 2010, 03:00:06 PM »
 I was actually a little stunned to see what a goal machine he was in England. 9 goals in 25 first team matches would sound pretty good to me about now.
[/quote]

He scored three in the 10-1 win over Ipswich.

TW


Offline Peabody

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Re: Old Sod's Army
« Reply #15 on: July 27, 2010, 03:10:30 PM »
Dave Sexton did go on to coach Arsenal and was very good. Tommy Trinder was the cause of a lot of Fulham's problems but he did not decide to get rid of Graham Leggatt, Rodney Marsh, Maurice Cook, Jimmy Langley and on the coaching staff Arthur Stevens and Joe Bacuzzi. They left because of Vic Buckingham and although I have no means of substantiay=ting this but he also wanted to get rid of a certain John Norman Haynes but was warned of as a step to far. That was Vic Buckingham.

Offline CorkedHat

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Re: Old Sod's Army
« Reply #16 on: July 28, 2010, 02:47:33 AM »
There was something of the Tosh Chamberlain about Howfield's left shot. When he hit it, it stayed hit.
That ten goal romp over Ipswich is indelible in my mind. It seemed impossible not to score - even Stratton and Yorky Whiting would have got a hat trick.
There was nothing classy about Bobby Howfield, not in the same way as Leggatt, Mitten or Barrett, but his strategy was if the ball was there, then kick the damned thing and don't fart arse about with it. He knew his limitations, did Bobby, and he played to them. Good advice to some other players I could mention