Author Topic: Do You Remember When People Used To Laugh.  (Read 1789 times)

Offline KingofCheese

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Re: Do You Remember When People Used To Laugh.
« Reply #40 on: July 11, 2019, 01:26:56 PM »
I was born in Fulham during the War when it was common for people to keep chickens and rabbits in their gardens. In common with many people in the area my grandparents used to get the help of a butchers from behind Stephendale Road if they needed it to do the killing and cleaning. This butcher was the first black man that I had ever seen and to the whole of the Sands End area he was known as ’Darkie’. No offence was intended and none was taken by this man . Oh for such times now!

"Oh for such times now!"? What do you mean? That you want to keep chickens and have them killed by local butchers or you can use derogatory terms for people?

Offline Wolf

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Re: Do You Remember When People Used To Laugh.
« Reply #41 on: July 11, 2019, 01:32:41 PM »
The state of this thread



Absolutely. Seeing some pronounced differences in generational norms. Thought it was a Fulham FC forum. ::off_Topic::

Offline KingofCheese

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Re: Do You Remember When People Used To Laugh.
« Reply #42 on: July 11, 2019, 01:48:09 PM »
I am increasingly concerned that we think we are building a cage to lock all the bad stuff in but in fact the cage is being built around us with us inside. The desire to rewrite history, to ban expression of ideas, to ban books, films and plays and to prosecute people who "offend" our worldview is playing out the world as warned by Orwell (1984) and Kafka (the Trial). Context is abandoned and everything is reacted to in a knee jerk way with groups running around social media with metaphorical pitchforks looking to "string people up" we desperately need to rid ourselves of this victim mentality as we now have the ridiculous situation where evil people claim to be the victims to avoid proper scrutiny. Take Lauren booth for example, she worked for PressTv an Iranian news agency that collaborates in the torture of opponents of the Iran regime but claims to be a victim in this country and a "human rights" campaigner.

So saying that I have a black friend who tells me how it felt having to go to school in the 70's after some programme or comedian laid into "the darkie"s" knowing that his day or week would be made miserable by people repeating that rubbish to him all the time. That isn't funny and I for one don't miss it.

Very well put. Totally agree, the worrisome thing for me is, that line of acceptable and not acceptable being skewed constantly by the loud minority who seem perpetually offended by anything and everything. It's such a strange culture that I think is absolutely harboured by social media platforms.

What is very worrying is that people who know exactly what they are doing, such as using quotes taken totally out of context, are using these to perpetuate their own ends. A current one is Boris Johnson's "pillar box" comment. I don't like him (as a politician) and I think he is more dodgy than Flash Harry the spiv as well as having the moral compass as the Borgias, but if you read the piece he wrote that included that description he was actually defending the right of these women to dress as they like. This in opposition to Denmark banning them. He said that to ban them would be wrong "a total ban on face-covering veils would give a boost to radicals who said there was a "clash of civilisations" between Islam and the West and could lead to "a general crackdown on any public symbols of religious affiliation". He may have used words that some people find "offensive" but why choose to ignore the general thrust of his argument which was a call to avoid authoritarian actions? I believe that the users of these words out of context know that most people won't read the original article and therefore they can attack him with it and paint him as an Islamophobe even though they know that they are telling lies. I see it time and time where educated people manipulate the general public because they know that they can get away with it. Farage and his friends did the same this week with our ambassador to the US - they blatantly pretended that what Sir Kim did was somehow disgraceful whilst knowing full well that without our diplomats feeding candid information back to our government they, the government, would be blindsided in the real world. Therefore they want to paint a picture to their audience which is a total lie and they get away with it even though it is an attempt to ruin the reputation of a good servant of this country.


Offline KingofCheese

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Re: Do You Remember When People Used To Laugh.
« Reply #43 on: July 11, 2019, 01:52:37 PM »
I am increasingly concerned that we think we are building a cage to lock all the bad stuff in but in fact the cage is being built around us with us inside. The desire to rewrite history, to ban expression of ideas, to ban books, films and plays and to prosecute people who "offend" our worldview is playing out the world as warned by Orwell (1984) and Kafka (the Trial). Context is abandoned and everything is reacted to in a knee jerk way with groups running around social media with metaphorical pitchforks looking to "string people up" we desperately need to rid ourselves of this victim mentality as we now have the ridiculous situation where evil people claim to be the victims to avoid proper scrutiny. Take Lauren booth for example, she worked for PressTv an Iranian news agency that collaborates in the torture of opponents of the Iran regime but claims to be a victim in this country and a "human rights" campaigner.

So saying that I have a black friend who tells me how it felt having to go to school in the 70's after some programme or comedian laid into "the darkie"s" knowing that his day or week would be made miserable by people repeating that rubbish to him all the time. That isn't funny and I for one don't miss it.


I was just listening to  musician Nitin Sawhney BBC radio's Desert Island discs, and he was talking about growing up in Rochester at a time of strong NF activity, and how as a kid he would be abused, and physically attacked, after programmes such as Love Thy Neighbour and Til Death Do Us Part had been on , with the same language used - though the latter programme was intended as a very funny  satire of a racist bigot in West Ham supporting Alf Garnett, which was how I watched it as a kid, but many apparently took Alf's words about immigrants seriously.


I can see where people are coming from, and agree that in some waays we have  become far too easily offended, and even if you see yourelf as pc, you can inadvertently offfend someone, and this often seems  completely over the top and intolerant in itself.

Alf Garnett would never be shown today, but to see the world from the point of view of people who do face genuine abuse and harassment, such as racism and homophobia puts things in a different light.

Our society is becoming worrylingly divisive, with even  people associated with the 'liberal' counter-culture, a voice of the marginalised and outsiders, like Morrisey, now gives support to  the views of a far right party, whose lapel badge he wears on TV.

I was born just after the ww2, in which both my parents were in the forces - my Dad at the terrible  bloodbath of Monte Cassino, which strongly damaged him mentally for  the rest of his life. Growing up near Brixton, my parents taught me that all people were  equal, but i saw a lot of hostility towrds the newly arrived  immigrants from the Caribbean round me from my fellow schoolkids.
But I think London has become a  fairly well integrated place racially.

I do read a lot about WW2, and the Holocaust though, and it worries me that I see a lot of the same situation that led to Nazi Germany today, and views that we thought were in the past are returning, even becoming acceptable.
Some may think this a good thing, I realise.

It seems that when people lose faith in the centre they rush to the extremes. Both main parties seem to be in the grip of the worst kind of people they have in their ranks.

Offline Russianrob

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Re: Do You Remember When People Used To Laugh.
« Reply #44 on: July 11, 2019, 02:20:52 PM »
Things can change quickly and more drastically than we can imagine.Nearing 60 now but when younger Russia was seen as an unapproachable enemy (like North Korea now).Soon l will be seeking citizenship but will remain forever Fulham wherever and whatever!

Offline Woolly Mammoth

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Re: Do You Remember When People Used To Laugh.
« Reply #45 on: July 11, 2019, 02:38:03 PM »
 I can still laugh  064.gif ...........
At myself !!


Offline David I

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Re: Do You Remember When People Used To Laugh.
« Reply #46 on: July 11, 2019, 02:54:14 PM »
Funniest thing I heard on the radio the other day was a discussion about the book “when a tiger came for tea”...
You had some saying it was euphemism for;
Hitler knocking on doors during German occupation.
The wife lying to her husband as she hadn’t made tea for when he arrived home.
Plus many others....

When they asked the author what the story was really about? She said “just a tiger coming for tea”

Offline snarks

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Re: Do You Remember When People Used To Laugh.
« Reply #47 on: July 11, 2019, 03:05:26 PM »
I can remember seeing TV showing no blacks, no dogs, no irish posters outside B&B's in the 60/70's

Nostalgia doesn't make that right, any more than love thy neighbour or the black and white minstrel show.

Time's change, norms change -  harking back to the old days, or identifying a group that we are not members of as being over sensitive isn't for us to do, it's for them to say what they find acceptable or not.

Quite rightly certain groups found the B&W minstrels denigrated them and Love they neighbuor as being offence. I accept their view.

What we need less of, is straight white men deciding what is best for everyone else.

Offline FFC1987

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Re: Do You Remember When People Used To Laugh.
« Reply #48 on: July 11, 2019, 03:07:07 PM »
I can remember seeing TV showing no blacks, no dogs, no irish posters outside B&B's in the 60/70's

Nostalgia doesn't make that right, any more than love thy neighbour or the black and white minstrel show.

Time's change, norms change -  harking back to the old days, or identifying a group that we are not members of as being over sensitive isn't for us to do, it's for them to say what they find acceptable or not.

Quite rightly certain groups found the B&W minstrels denigrated them and Love they neighbuor as being offence. I accept their view.

What we need less of, is straight white men deciding what is best for everyone else.

Imagine being emboldened enough to say this kind of cr*p 'What we need less of, is straight white men deciding what is best for everyone else.'

Absolutely no respect for this kind of dialogue.


Offline snarks

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Re: Do You Remember When People Used To Laugh.
« Reply #49 on: July 11, 2019, 03:11:46 PM »
I can remember seeing TV showing no blacks, no dogs, no irish posters outside B&B's in the 60/70's

Nostalgia doesn't make that right, any more than love thy neighbour or the black and white minstrel show.

Time's change, norms change -  harking back to the old days, or identifying a group that we are not members of as being over sensitive isn't for us to do, it's for them to say what they find acceptable or not.

Quite rightly certain groups found the B&W minstrels denigrated them and Love they neighbuor as being offence. I accept their view.

What we need less of, is straight white men deciding what is best for everyone else.

Imagine being emboldened enough to say this kind of cr*p 'What we need less of, is straight white men deciding what is best for everyone else.'

Absolutely no respect for this kind of dialogue.

You may not have respect for it, but it's a fact.

The most privileged and entitled group saying what everyone else should think, feel and accept, you think that's OK.

Well that's narrow minded

Offline FFC1987

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Re: Do You Remember When People Used To Laugh.
« Reply #50 on: July 11, 2019, 03:16:11 PM »
I can remember seeing TV showing no blacks, no dogs, no irish posters outside B&B's in the 60/70's

Nostalgia doesn't make that right, any more than love thy neighbour or the black and white minstrel show.

Time's change, norms change -  harking back to the old days, or identifying a group that we are not members of as being over sensitive isn't for us to do, it's for them to say what they find acceptable or not.

Quite rightly certain groups found the B&W minstrels denigrated them and Love they neighbuor as being offence. I accept their view.

What we need less of, is straight white men deciding what is best for everyone else.

Imagine being emboldened enough to say this kind of cr*p 'What we need less of, is straight white men deciding what is best for everyone else.'

Absolutely no respect for this kind of dialogue.

You may not have respect for it, but it's a fact.

The most privileged and entitled group saying what everyone else should think, feel and accept, you think that's OK.

Well that's narrow minded

Having been born in the late 80's, I've lived with policies, help and guidance from all walks of life. The only thing narrow minded is pretending that our history over the last 3 decades is solely decided by 'straight white men'. Also, suggesting there is this one binary type of people (straight white men) who have this absolute privilege over everyone else is equally absurd. There has been and still is huge hierarchy shifts between the groups so treating them as one homogeneous group is ridiculous.  That's an absurdity in the UK. We're massively multi cultural and I for one am massively proud of that so it isn't a fact to suggest otherwise.

I guess I should also preface, I shouldn't have to but I will, that I don't think 'straight white men' tell people how they should feel, think or even accept. It's a fact that the group in question, do not have a monopoly on this.
« Last Edit: July 11, 2019, 03:21:06 PM by FFC1987 »

Offline cookieg

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Re: Do You Remember When People Used To Laugh.
« Reply #51 on: July 11, 2019, 04:08:28 PM »
Laughing has been banned as someone might find it offensive.


Offline Statto

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Re: Do You Remember When People Used To Laugh.
« Reply #52 on: July 11, 2019, 06:42:15 PM »
What we need less of, is straight white men deciding what is best for everyone else.

Am I the only one who thinks straight white men have done a pretty good job of running things thus far? Presumably not given Britain remains one of the most popular places in the world to live, including among women, gays and various people of other ethnicities who risk their lives to scramble over from other parts of the world which, as far as I can tell, are all much worse places to live in than Britain.
« Last Edit: July 11, 2019, 06:44:05 PM by Statto »

Offline Mince n Tatties

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Re: Do You Remember When People Used To Laugh.
« Reply #53 on: July 11, 2019, 06:48:29 PM »
What we need less of, is straight white men deciding what is best for everyone else.

Am I the only one who thinks straight white men have done a pretty good job of running things thus far? Presumably not given Britain remains one of the most popular places in the world to live, including among women, gays and various people of other ethnicities who risk their lives to scramble over from other parts of the world which, as far as I can tell, are all much worse places to live in than Britain.


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The gins kicked in.

Offline Andy S

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Re: Do You Remember When People Used To Laugh.
« Reply #54 on: July 11, 2019, 07:13:28 PM »
I never deliberately go out to offend anyone but if I do offend them I apologise. I cannot do this walking on broken glass bit. I don’t consider myself racist or sexist. Humour does not need to be about race creed or colour. It can be about anything. Why should you never use beef stew as a pass word........Because it is not stroganoff. That might not be funny but it is as funny as an Irish joke


Offline Jamie88

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Re: Do You Remember When People Used To Laugh.
« Reply #55 on: July 11, 2019, 07:28:17 PM »
Anyway...we signed anyone yet?

Offline Mince n Tatties

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Re: Do You Remember When People Used To Laugh.
« Reply #56 on: July 11, 2019, 07:34:23 PM »
Anyway...we signed anyone yet?

No....But there is a med....Ooh I better not😝

Offline Baszab

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Re: Do You Remember When People Used To Laugh.
« Reply #57 on: July 11, 2019, 07:39:52 PM »
What I find absolutely hilarious is how a uber-wealthy American can invest hundreds of millions of dollars in a English football team - simply as a vehicle for his son to manage

I have advised many family run companies and seen second generation offspring bring these companies to their knees - possibly why SK doesn’t want his son and style of management in his main business

Nepotism rules and blood is thicker than water - and our hopes for FFC rest on an inexperienced Dof

Now that’s hilarious

Offline Lighthouse

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Re: Do You Remember When People Used To Laugh.
« Reply #58 on: July 11, 2019, 08:56:22 PM »
I can remember seeing TV showing no blacks, no dogs, no irish posters outside B&B's in the 60/70's

Nostalgia doesn't make that right, any more than love thy neighbour or the black and white minstrel show.

Time's change, norms change -  harking back to the old days, or identifying a group that we are not members of as being over sensitive isn't for us to do, it's for them to say what they find acceptable or not.

Quite rightly certain groups found the B&W minstrels denigrated them and Love they neighbuor as being offence. I accept their view.

What we need less of, is straight white men deciding what is best for everyone else.

Imagine being emboldened enough to say this kind of cr*p 'What we need less of, is straight white men deciding what is best for everyone else.'

Absolutely no respect for this kind of dialogue.

You may not have respect for it, but it's a fact.

The most privileged and entitled group saying what everyone else should think, feel and accept, you think that's OK.

Well that's narrow minded

That's the point. People saying they think something is offensive is one thing. But saying people are wrong and offensive to have watched and accepted it is another. I find the behaviour of some forthright American football women players highly offensive. I find the insistence that some modern thinking allows a girl or a boy the right to change their Sex and then be insulted if you don't use the correct pronoun. In other words by all means discuss that a football player is good or bad. But allow me to disagree without telling me I am wrong. Thought I would bring it back to football to please those who hate anything non football on these pages.

Offline KingofCheese

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Re: Do You Remember When People Used To Laugh.
« Reply #59 on: July 12, 2019, 02:53:07 AM »
I can remember seeing TV showing no blacks, no dogs, no irish posters outside B&B's in the 60/70's

Nostalgia doesn't make that right, any more than love thy neighbour or the black and white minstrel show.

Time's change, norms change -  harking back to the old days, or identifying a group that we are not members of as being over sensitive isn't for us to do, it's for them to say what they find acceptable or not.

Quite rightly certain groups found the B&W minstrels denigrated them and Love they neighbuor as being offence. I accept their view.

What we need less of, is straight white men deciding what is best for everyone else.

I like others are going to have to disagree and point out your own narrow mindedness which should hopefully enrich you. I don’t know about your life and therefore can’t speculate on your life so can’t tell if you are “privilege”or not. I agree totally with you on the b&w minsiterals etc. So let’s start there. I was also thrown lately to find out that the greatest resistance to inoculation was in France rather than the North African and northern sub Saharan African nations I would have guessed which shows that I have a “narrow” mind based on easy stereotypes like we all do and you also seem to be subject to. Let me explain.

Here is my white straight privilege and please do let me know which part you envy:

Born in a working class town, parents split when I was seven, by eight I was in a children’s home, my sister and mother froze in a house without heating as my father refused to pay them the money they were entitld to. Coming out of foster and children’s home I lived with an alcoholic step father who punched me around and mentality abused myself and my siblings and having not attended school for two years I started secondary school in special English. I left school at 15 and had to start work to feed the family, no longer wanting cheese and potato pie as our main Sunday lunch because we couldn’t afford meat. My grandparents by the way had outside toilets until they died.

What part of this privilege do you envy?

On a positive note I was lucky to live in a country of fantastic opportunity with free schooling and a national health service that is still the envy of the world (I know how expensive it can be to be bitten by a spider in Africa!). With great teachers and bosses I was encouraged to work hard and to invest in my education and am now doing a masters degree (all done in my own time) whilst working and raising a fantastic family. My working class wife and I through hard work have raised children that can apply to Oxbridge and the other top universities. I always know how lucky I am but my skin colour was not a factor nor was who I spleep with..what is important was the encouragement of others and the determination to be better than I was. Btw, I am privileged to work with two brilliant black women directors of my company who are fantastic role models for women and people of colour..Again it is their hard work that got them there not their gender or skin colour.